Abstract Title

Session S-09E: Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Species: Threats and Conservation

Presenter/Author Information

Kristin NeunekerFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

The Olympia Oyster (Ostrea lurida), the only native oyster found on the west coast of North America, has been depleted over time due to over harvesting and other environmental factors. Recently interest has surfaced in reestablishing these populations, including a restoration project in Fidalgo Bay, WA, which began in 2002. In order to assess the success of this restored population we investigated variation of settlement of juveniles in space and time. Through placing oyster shells modified to collect settlers at 7 sites, an assessment of their distribution was possible. There was a late July peak in settlement during the 6th week of study; however, this peak was only detectable at the intertidal locations. The results indicate that O. lurida larvae preferentially settled at two intertidal sites, which were nearest to each other and the site of the 2002 restoration effort. This may point to the success of the restoration site as well as support the hypothesis that larvae may settle preferentially to locations with suitable habitat or adult populations. Additionally, rates of settlement were lowest at the mouth of the bay suggesting there may be little dispersal of organisms out of the bay.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Temporal and spatial patterns of Olympia oyster settlement in Fidalgo Bay, WA

Room 6C

The Olympia Oyster (Ostrea lurida), the only native oyster found on the west coast of North America, has been depleted over time due to over harvesting and other environmental factors. Recently interest has surfaced in reestablishing these populations, including a restoration project in Fidalgo Bay, WA, which began in 2002. In order to assess the success of this restored population we investigated variation of settlement of juveniles in space and time. Through placing oyster shells modified to collect settlers at 7 sites, an assessment of their distribution was possible. There was a late July peak in settlement during the 6th week of study; however, this peak was only detectable at the intertidal locations. The results indicate that O. lurida larvae preferentially settled at two intertidal sites, which were nearest to each other and the site of the 2002 restoration effort. This may point to the success of the restoration site as well as support the hypothesis that larvae may settle preferentially to locations with suitable habitat or adult populations. Additionally, rates of settlement were lowest at the mouth of the bay suggesting there may be little dispersal of organisms out of the bay.