Abstract Title

Session S-09E: Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Species: Threats and Conservation

Presenter/Author Information

Courtney GreinerFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Long-term ecological research is essential to the implementation of effective natural resource management. These studies can provide invaluable insight into ecological processes and environmental change over prolonged periods of time, thus supporting adaptive management practices. From 1960-1971, an intensive intertidal study was conducted on Kiket Island, near La Conner, WA to establish baseline conditions within existing intertidal communities. Benthic macroinvertebrate count data were collected and analyzed along five elevations at eight transects around the island. Approximately two decades later, land ownership on Kiket Island halted tribal harvest and created a de facto no-take marine reserve. The study was replicated in 2011 to quantify potential ecological changes on the beaches since the baseline 1960-1971 data were collected and a no-take marine reserve was enacted. Our data analysis mainly focused on changes in bivalve population parameters of Saxidoums gigantea and Leukoma staminea, species culturally and commercially important to the Tribe, but also examined population parameter changes in other molluscs and the presence of invasive invertebrate species. Results from our analysis will be used to inform future management plans and provide insight into long-term ecological trends within the Salish Sea.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Decadal ecological change on Kukutali Preserve, Washington

Room 6C

Long-term ecological research is essential to the implementation of effective natural resource management. These studies can provide invaluable insight into ecological processes and environmental change over prolonged periods of time, thus supporting adaptive management practices. From 1960-1971, an intensive intertidal study was conducted on Kiket Island, near La Conner, WA to establish baseline conditions within existing intertidal communities. Benthic macroinvertebrate count data were collected and analyzed along five elevations at eight transects around the island. Approximately two decades later, land ownership on Kiket Island halted tribal harvest and created a de facto no-take marine reserve. The study was replicated in 2011 to quantify potential ecological changes on the beaches since the baseline 1960-1971 data were collected and a no-take marine reserve was enacted. Our data analysis mainly focused on changes in bivalve population parameters of Saxidoums gigantea and Leukoma staminea, species culturally and commercially important to the Tribe, but also examined population parameter changes in other molluscs and the presence of invasive invertebrate species. Results from our analysis will be used to inform future management plans and provide insight into long-term ecological trends within the Salish Sea.