Abstract Title

Session S-09E: Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Species: Threats and Conservation

Presenter/Author Information

Alaina OrrFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Glacial Heritage Preserve (GHP) is a prairie located in Thurston County Washington, which also includes forested areas. A process using controlled burns has been implemented over the last 15 or so years to help maintain the GHP. The purpose of our investigation was to determine the effects of controlled burns on the abundance of species Fragaria virginiana (wild strawberry) and Camassia quamash (blue camas) because both of these species were in bloom in the GHP during our data collection dates. Our data were collected in the odd-numbered burn years from 2001 to 2011 as well as a control site that was never subjected to burning. The data were collected using a random walk method within the burn areas. Our hypothesis was that we expected to find that if we collect data of abundance and frequency for species C. quamash and F. virginiana in varying burn area years, then the species will be more abundant and exhibit higher frequency in the areas that were more recently burned, because the soil will be more nutrient-rich from the burning of other plants, allowing C. quamash and F. virginiana to thrive more easily. We determined through our investigation that C. quamash thrive in areas where the burn occurred more recently, and the F. virginiana are more abundant in areas where the burn on the area was less recent. The average abundance of both C. quamash and F. virginiana to be higher on Mima mounds than in the swales between them. A question we were not able to address but could be researched in future studies include examining how areas that have been previously burned at multiple or varying times affect the abundance of a certain species.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

The effect of prescribed burning on the abundance of Fragaria virginiana (wild strawberry) and Camassia quamash (blue camas) in Glacial Heritage Preserve

Room 6C

Glacial Heritage Preserve (GHP) is a prairie located in Thurston County Washington, which also includes forested areas. A process using controlled burns has been implemented over the last 15 or so years to help maintain the GHP. The purpose of our investigation was to determine the effects of controlled burns on the abundance of species Fragaria virginiana (wild strawberry) and Camassia quamash (blue camas) because both of these species were in bloom in the GHP during our data collection dates. Our data were collected in the odd-numbered burn years from 2001 to 2011 as well as a control site that was never subjected to burning. The data were collected using a random walk method within the burn areas. Our hypothesis was that we expected to find that if we collect data of abundance and frequency for species C. quamash and F. virginiana in varying burn area years, then the species will be more abundant and exhibit higher frequency in the areas that were more recently burned, because the soil will be more nutrient-rich from the burning of other plants, allowing C. quamash and F. virginiana to thrive more easily. We determined through our investigation that C. quamash thrive in areas where the burn occurred more recently, and the F. virginiana are more abundant in areas where the burn on the area was less recent. The average abundance of both C. quamash and F. virginiana to be higher on Mima mounds than in the swales between them. A question we were not able to address but could be researched in future studies include examining how areas that have been previously burned at multiple or varying times affect the abundance of a certain species.