Abstract Title

Session S-09E: Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Species: Threats and Conservation

Presenter/Author Information

Sally Bartley AbellaFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Recently, healthy populations of the invasive mollusk species commonly called the New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) have been confirmed in a number of watersheds that feed into Puget Sound, with locations including both streams and lake shores. Three of these infestations are within the greater Lake Washington basin in densely populated areas of King County. In other areas throughout the western United States, mudsnail populations have skyrocketed, out-competing native freshwater species that provide food for salmon, while at the same time decreasing biotic integrity scores. There is some evidence that mudsnails eaten by fish pass through the gut unharmed without providing any nutritional benefit. King County has created an identification field card available on-line at (http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/biodiversity/threats/Invasives/Mudsnails.aspx) for use in determining whether snails in a water body are likely to be a new mudsnail infestation or a native species. The card also contains information on recommended decontamination procedures that should be followed to avoid spreading mudsnails to new areas. King County has also applied the criteria provided by Therriault et al (2010) to determine the suitability of water quality in various county streams to support significant populations of the snails, should they be introduced. To-date, most streams in the region appear to be at least moderately good candidates for successful colonization by mudsnails, based on calcium, conductivity, nutrients, temperature, and other parameters. Therefore, education and rigorous decontamination procedures are top priorities for people (and their gear) who enter Puget Sound lakes and streams for recreation, fishing, habitat improvement and restoration, flood protection, and road maintenance and construction.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Invasive New Zealand mudsnails in mid Puget Sound (Salish Sea) lowland water courses

Room 6C

Recently, healthy populations of the invasive mollusk species commonly called the New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) have been confirmed in a number of watersheds that feed into Puget Sound, with locations including both streams and lake shores. Three of these infestations are within the greater Lake Washington basin in densely populated areas of King County. In other areas throughout the western United States, mudsnail populations have skyrocketed, out-competing native freshwater species that provide food for salmon, while at the same time decreasing biotic integrity scores. There is some evidence that mudsnails eaten by fish pass through the gut unharmed without providing any nutritional benefit. King County has created an identification field card available on-line at (http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/biodiversity/threats/Invasives/Mudsnails.aspx) for use in determining whether snails in a water body are likely to be a new mudsnail infestation or a native species. The card also contains information on recommended decontamination procedures that should be followed to avoid spreading mudsnails to new areas. King County has also applied the criteria provided by Therriault et al (2010) to determine the suitability of water quality in various county streams to support significant populations of the snails, should they be introduced. To-date, most streams in the region appear to be at least moderately good candidates for successful colonization by mudsnails, based on calcium, conductivity, nutrients, temperature, and other parameters. Therefore, education and rigorous decontamination procedures are top priorities for people (and their gear) who enter Puget Sound lakes and streams for recreation, fishing, habitat improvement and restoration, flood protection, and road maintenance and construction.