Abstract Title

Session S-09H: Trading Cultural Ecosystem Services from Data Collection to Decision Making

Proposed Abstract Title

Coal conflict and tidal tensions: local preferences for energy infrastructure development in Puget Sound

Presenter/Author Information

Sarah KlainFollow

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 6C

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Global tensions over climate change are playing out at a local scale in the Salish Sea. While community groups capture newspaper headlines in their fight against fossil fuel infrastructure expansion, less public attention is currently paid to efforts to reduce reliance on carbon-emitting sources of electricity. Focusing on place attachment, place-identity and aesthetic values, I assess a wide range of stakeholder's opinions on the 1) Gateway Pacific Terminal Cherry Point proposal to expand rail road shipping and export of coal and 2) testing of tidal stream turbines, a potential source of renewable energy, in Puget Sound. To what extent do people whose livelihoods are linked to marine and coastal ecosystems perceive the proposed railroad expansion and tidal stream turbines as disrupting their enjoyment of cultural ecosystem services, such as recreational fishing and sense of place? How do different stakeholders consider the economic benefits and environmental risks associated with these projects? What are these stakeholder's major concerns about these developments? I explore the extent to which people’s beliefs about energy security, a Puget Sound identity and concern for the local environment explain opinions about these two energy infrastructure options. Results are intended to inform environmental risk assessments and participatory processes associated with siting marine renewable energy.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Coal conflict and tidal tensions: local preferences for energy infrastructure development in Puget Sound

Room 6C

Global tensions over climate change are playing out at a local scale in the Salish Sea. While community groups capture newspaper headlines in their fight against fossil fuel infrastructure expansion, less public attention is currently paid to efforts to reduce reliance on carbon-emitting sources of electricity. Focusing on place attachment, place-identity and aesthetic values, I assess a wide range of stakeholder's opinions on the 1) Gateway Pacific Terminal Cherry Point proposal to expand rail road shipping and export of coal and 2) testing of tidal stream turbines, a potential source of renewable energy, in Puget Sound. To what extent do people whose livelihoods are linked to marine and coastal ecosystems perceive the proposed railroad expansion and tidal stream turbines as disrupting their enjoyment of cultural ecosystem services, such as recreational fishing and sense of place? How do different stakeholders consider the economic benefits and environmental risks associated with these projects? What are these stakeholder's major concerns about these developments? I explore the extent to which people’s beliefs about energy security, a Puget Sound identity and concern for the local environment explain opinions about these two energy infrastructure options. Results are intended to inform environmental risk assessments and participatory processes associated with siting marine renewable energy.