Abstract Title

Session S-10D: Cross-Habitat Linkages and Landscape Scale Approaches to Ecosystem Management

Presenter/Author Information

Traci SandersonFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Nitrogen is a limiting nutrient in marine waters and anthropogenic additions of nitrogen may lead to eutrophication and hypoxia. This can lead to die-offs of marine flora and fauna. Perpetual enrichment can lead to changes in the dominant species of lower trophic levels. Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen include farm wastes, inorganic fertilizers, and human sewage. These sources of nitrogen have different isotopic signatures (δ15N), which can be used as a tracer of anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to the ecosystem. This study evaluated stable nitrogen isotopic compositions of marine algae on a large-scale in Hood Canal and on a small-scale in Oak Bay, both in Puget Sound. On a large-scale this study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to link overall watershed development metrics with isotopic composition of algae in the nearshore. On a small-scale the study evaluated the effectiveness of marine riparian vegetation to remove nitrogen from on-site septic systems. Data was being processed at the time of abstract submission, but it is hypothesized that increased development will be reflected in an enriched δ15N and marine riparian vegetation will sequester nitrogen and be reflected in a depleted δ15N.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

The use of stable nitrogen isotopes in Fucus gardneri to evaluate landscape-level and small-scale anthropogenic inputs to Puget Sound

Room 6C

Nitrogen is a limiting nutrient in marine waters and anthropogenic additions of nitrogen may lead to eutrophication and hypoxia. This can lead to die-offs of marine flora and fauna. Perpetual enrichment can lead to changes in the dominant species of lower trophic levels. Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen include farm wastes, inorganic fertilizers, and human sewage. These sources of nitrogen have different isotopic signatures (δ15N), which can be used as a tracer of anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to the ecosystem. This study evaluated stable nitrogen isotopic compositions of marine algae on a large-scale in Hood Canal and on a small-scale in Oak Bay, both in Puget Sound. On a large-scale this study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to link overall watershed development metrics with isotopic composition of algae in the nearshore. On a small-scale the study evaluated the effectiveness of marine riparian vegetation to remove nitrogen from on-site septic systems. Data was being processed at the time of abstract submission, but it is hypothesized that increased development will be reflected in an enriched δ15N and marine riparian vegetation will sequester nitrogen and be reflected in a depleted δ15N.