Abstract Title

Session S-10D: Cross-Habitat Linkages and Landscape Scale Approaches to Ecosystem Management

Presenter/Author Information

Cynthia RossiFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Riparian corridors along marine shorelines, rivers, and floodplains provide important ecological functions for salmonid species and other wildlife, including shade, large woody debris, and dispersal of food to adjacent water bodies. The protection and restoration of riverine floodplain habitat is fundamental to the recovery of federally listed salmonid populations in the Puget Sound region. A major challenge of the State’s Shoreline Management Act and Growth Management Act is to manage development impacts and protect ecological functions in riparian corridors along the marine shoreline. The characteristics of riparian corridors are often a highly contentious topic for local governments and the public. This situation is exacerbated because we currently lack comprehensive spatial data at relevant scales to describe the characteristics of riparian vegetation in most areas. Comprehensive riparian vegetation data, as developed in the PNPTC’s riparian assessment project, is valuable in helping to describe ecological conditions along marine shorelines, floodplains and major river corridors. Its analysis in association with other ecologically relevant data fills a critical information gap, addresses unfounded assumptions, and helps focus on the real issues to be resolved in making land use decisions. These data were presented through maps and data summaries that facilitated a common understanding of riparian conditions and benefitted the land use regulatory planning processes. The PNPTC evaluated current NAIP imagery (2009) and field tested data in four counties. The final riparian land cover datasets for each county covered a band of 300 feet along the marine shoreline and freshwater stream Shorelines of the State. This data is currently being utilized in three SMP updates (Kitsap, Clallam and Mason counties). The PNPTC would like to present this data and its applications to the region in order to demonstrate integrated landscape scale assessment data used in local planning.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Point No Point Treaty Council’s Riparian Vegetation Assessment Project

Room 6C

Riparian corridors along marine shorelines, rivers, and floodplains provide important ecological functions for salmonid species and other wildlife, including shade, large woody debris, and dispersal of food to adjacent water bodies. The protection and restoration of riverine floodplain habitat is fundamental to the recovery of federally listed salmonid populations in the Puget Sound region. A major challenge of the State’s Shoreline Management Act and Growth Management Act is to manage development impacts and protect ecological functions in riparian corridors along the marine shoreline. The characteristics of riparian corridors are often a highly contentious topic for local governments and the public. This situation is exacerbated because we currently lack comprehensive spatial data at relevant scales to describe the characteristics of riparian vegetation in most areas. Comprehensive riparian vegetation data, as developed in the PNPTC’s riparian assessment project, is valuable in helping to describe ecological conditions along marine shorelines, floodplains and major river corridors. Its analysis in association with other ecologically relevant data fills a critical information gap, addresses unfounded assumptions, and helps focus on the real issues to be resolved in making land use decisions. These data were presented through maps and data summaries that facilitated a common understanding of riparian conditions and benefitted the land use regulatory planning processes. The PNPTC evaluated current NAIP imagery (2009) and field tested data in four counties. The final riparian land cover datasets for each county covered a band of 300 feet along the marine shoreline and freshwater stream Shorelines of the State. This data is currently being utilized in three SMP updates (Kitsap, Clallam and Mason counties). The PNPTC would like to present this data and its applications to the region in order to demonstrate integrated landscape scale assessment data used in local planning.