Abstract Title

Session S-04B: Water Quality I

Proposed Abstract Title

A Laundry Load of Chlorinated Flame Retardants: A pathway from households to wastewater treatment plants

Keywords

Toxics

Location

Room 608-609

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

The role of household laundry as a pathway for the transport of flame retardants from homes to waterways was investigated. Flame retardants are commonly used in consumer products found in the home, and also widely found in surface water, sediments, fish, and wildlife. The mechanisms by which flame retardants are transported from indoor to outdoor environments, however, are largely unknown. Besides their known use in household products, flame retardants have been detected in indoor air, house dust, surface wipes, and in clothes dryer lint, indicating their mobility in the indoor environment. In recent years, chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (ClOPFRs) have come into widespread use, in part as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To investigate transport from the indoor to outdoor environment, household dust was collected from 20 homes in Longview and Vancouver, WA and analyzed for ClOPFRs. In addition, wastewater from household laundry was collected from each home to investigate the hypothesis that flame retardants on clothing and transferring to laundry water is a source to wastewater and waterways. Three ClOPFRs— tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)—were detected in 100% of the dust samples at levels ranging up to 82,700 ng/g. The three ClOPFRs were detected in 100% of the laundry wastewater samples, at levels up to 561,000 ng/L. In contrast to PBDEs, the ClOPFRs are resilient to wastewater treatment, and previous research has detected these compounds in treatment plant effluent. The ClOPFR contribution of laundry wastewater to wastewater treatment plants was estimated. Based on these estimates, laundry water is likely the primary source of ClOPFRs to treatment plants. With their resilience to wastewater treatment, this pathway is a significant source of ClOPFR pollution in the aquatic environment.

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May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

A Laundry Load of Chlorinated Flame Retardants: A pathway from households to wastewater treatment plants

Room 608-609

The role of household laundry as a pathway for the transport of flame retardants from homes to waterways was investigated. Flame retardants are commonly used in consumer products found in the home, and also widely found in surface water, sediments, fish, and wildlife. The mechanisms by which flame retardants are transported from indoor to outdoor environments, however, are largely unknown. Besides their known use in household products, flame retardants have been detected in indoor air, house dust, surface wipes, and in clothes dryer lint, indicating their mobility in the indoor environment. In recent years, chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (ClOPFRs) have come into widespread use, in part as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To investigate transport from the indoor to outdoor environment, household dust was collected from 20 homes in Longview and Vancouver, WA and analyzed for ClOPFRs. In addition, wastewater from household laundry was collected from each home to investigate the hypothesis that flame retardants on clothing and transferring to laundry water is a source to wastewater and waterways. Three ClOPFRs— tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)—were detected in 100% of the dust samples at levels ranging up to 82,700 ng/g. The three ClOPFRs were detected in 100% of the laundry wastewater samples, at levels up to 561,000 ng/L. In contrast to PBDEs, the ClOPFRs are resilient to wastewater treatment, and previous research has detected these compounds in treatment plant effluent. The ClOPFR contribution of laundry wastewater to wastewater treatment plants was estimated. Based on these estimates, laundry water is likely the primary source of ClOPFRs to treatment plants. With their resilience to wastewater treatment, this pathway is a significant source of ClOPFR pollution in the aquatic environment.