Abstract Title

Session S-01D: Pelagic Ecology in the Salish Sea I

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Bacteria play an important role in the marine ecosystem through biodegradation, photosynthesis and respiration, yet dynamics of these bacterial communities within the Salish Sea remain largely unknown. To understand how external environmental changes affect community composition within the Puget Sound, we examined bacterial community profiles from water collected between April and October of 2011 and looked for relationships across oceanographic basins, over time, and among different geomorphic types (i.e., river delta, exposed, large bay, small bay). Significant community similarities existed within each basin and between months. Among the six basins, Hood Canal bacterial communities were the most distinctive. Community compositions between basins were statistically similar within 3 sets of months: April and May; July, August, and September; and June and October. Using a partial canonical correspondence analysis, we found that a combination of physical parameters explained 23% of the total community variation. Permutational multivariate analyses on community composition identified a number of significant habitat qualities associated with community similarities such as percentage development of catchment area (p < 0.002) and river delta sites (p < 0.001). By identifing relationships of bacterial communities with seasonal time points, geographic and geomorphic habitats, and environmental parameters we are able to build the groundwork for future studies seeking to understand how changing climates and watersheds may impact microbial community structures.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Bacterial community structures in pelagic waters of greater Puget Sound

Room 6C

Bacteria play an important role in the marine ecosystem through biodegradation, photosynthesis and respiration, yet dynamics of these bacterial communities within the Salish Sea remain largely unknown. To understand how external environmental changes affect community composition within the Puget Sound, we examined bacterial community profiles from water collected between April and October of 2011 and looked for relationships across oceanographic basins, over time, and among different geomorphic types (i.e., river delta, exposed, large bay, small bay). Significant community similarities existed within each basin and between months. Among the six basins, Hood Canal bacterial communities were the most distinctive. Community compositions between basins were statistically similar within 3 sets of months: April and May; July, August, and September; and June and October. Using a partial canonical correspondence analysis, we found that a combination of physical parameters explained 23% of the total community variation. Permutational multivariate analyses on community composition identified a number of significant habitat qualities associated with community similarities such as percentage development of catchment area (p < 0.002) and river delta sites (p < 0.001). By identifing relationships of bacterial communities with seasonal time points, geographic and geomorphic habitats, and environmental parameters we are able to build the groundwork for future studies seeking to understand how changing climates and watersheds may impact microbial community structures.