Abstract Title

Session S-04E: Managing Floodplains for Multiple Benefits

Keywords

Habitat

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Leaders are confronted with two types of problems: technical problems, which can be solved by expertise and good management and "adaptive" problems, such as poverty, which require innovation and learning (Heifetz, "Leadership without Easy Answers," Harvard Press, 1994). This presentation will explain how the issues of river/floodplain management fall into the latter category and provide several examples of how to add to the classic planning framework to move challenging multi-objective floodplain projects to completion. Two project examples provided are Rainbow Bend constructed in 2013 and Upper Carlson scheduled for summer 2014 construction as part of the Snoqualmie at Fall City Corridor project. The presentation will show how to implement multi-objective projects and will describe the richness that has been added to proven planning processes from the range of partners, tribes and stakeholders. Attendees will be encouraged to brace themselves for the intensity and, ultimately, satisfaction of the work and dedication needed to wade into floodplain projects that achieve multiple-objective purposes for the long run. As these two examples will show, the implementation and details of multiple-objective floodplain projects differ between rivers and even between reaches in the same river. Issues that emerge can be surprising and typically do not arrive with initial clarity on a path towards resolution. However application of the principles of public engagement, disciplined technical analyses that wade into complexities, active engagement with partners, tribes and stakeholders, and commitments to long term monitoring and management continues to illuminate pathways to project completion.

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Implementing multiple benefit floodplain projects in King County

Room 613-614

Leaders are confronted with two types of problems: technical problems, which can be solved by expertise and good management and "adaptive" problems, such as poverty, which require innovation and learning (Heifetz, "Leadership without Easy Answers," Harvard Press, 1994). This presentation will explain how the issues of river/floodplain management fall into the latter category and provide several examples of how to add to the classic planning framework to move challenging multi-objective floodplain projects to completion. Two project examples provided are Rainbow Bend constructed in 2013 and Upper Carlson scheduled for summer 2014 construction as part of the Snoqualmie at Fall City Corridor project. The presentation will show how to implement multi-objective projects and will describe the richness that has been added to proven planning processes from the range of partners, tribes and stakeholders. Attendees will be encouraged to brace themselves for the intensity and, ultimately, satisfaction of the work and dedication needed to wade into floodplain projects that achieve multiple-objective purposes for the long run. As these two examples will show, the implementation and details of multiple-objective floodplain projects differ between rivers and even between reaches in the same river. Issues that emerge can be surprising and typically do not arrive with initial clarity on a path towards resolution. However application of the principles of public engagement, disciplined technical analyses that wade into complexities, active engagement with partners, tribes and stakeholders, and commitments to long term monitoring and management continues to illuminate pathways to project completion.