Abstract Title

Session S-01D: Pelagic Ecology in the Salish Sea I

Presenter/Author Information

Alexis DittoeFollow

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Within Puget Sound there has been a nutrient shift that is hypothesized to impact diatom abundance throughout the Sound. The Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) has been monitoring this shift through the long-term collection of nutrient data from many locations in Puget Sound. Monthly aerial surveys are reported through Eyes Over Puget Sound (EOPS), monitoring phytoplankton blooms throughout the Puget Sound region. Beginning in 2008, the DOE recorded a disparity between the nutrient data collected in Puget Sound and the nutrient data collected in Possession Sound, an estuarine system in the Northeast arm of the Whidbey Basin in Puget Sound. Students at the Ocean Research College Academy, an early college program through Everett Community College have been conducting baseline estuarine monitoring for the past six years. In order to assess the impact of the nutrient shift in Possession Sound, the five most prominent phytoplankton and zooplankton species from monthly State of Possession Sound (SOPS) research cruises conducted over the past six years were analyzed with an overlay of nutrient data from the same time period. This research evolved through the question of whether a shift from diatom-based food webs to dinoflagellate predominant food webs will emerge in the data specifically from Possession Sound, as it did in the DOE data collected from Puget Sound. The working hypothesis is that when silicate levels decline, diatomaceous phytoplankton are limited by the lack of silicate in the water. Plankton results from each cruise are analyzed for spatial and temporal distribution and correlated to seasonal nutrient data. Preliminary results suggest a shift in the phytoplankton assemblage.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Nutrient Driven Shifts in the Plankton Communities in Possession Sound

Room 6C

Within Puget Sound there has been a nutrient shift that is hypothesized to impact diatom abundance throughout the Sound. The Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) has been monitoring this shift through the long-term collection of nutrient data from many locations in Puget Sound. Monthly aerial surveys are reported through Eyes Over Puget Sound (EOPS), monitoring phytoplankton blooms throughout the Puget Sound region. Beginning in 2008, the DOE recorded a disparity between the nutrient data collected in Puget Sound and the nutrient data collected in Possession Sound, an estuarine system in the Northeast arm of the Whidbey Basin in Puget Sound. Students at the Ocean Research College Academy, an early college program through Everett Community College have been conducting baseline estuarine monitoring for the past six years. In order to assess the impact of the nutrient shift in Possession Sound, the five most prominent phytoplankton and zooplankton species from monthly State of Possession Sound (SOPS) research cruises conducted over the past six years were analyzed with an overlay of nutrient data from the same time period. This research evolved through the question of whether a shift from diatom-based food webs to dinoflagellate predominant food webs will emerge in the data specifically from Possession Sound, as it did in the DOE data collected from Puget Sound. The working hypothesis is that when silicate levels decline, diatomaceous phytoplankton are limited by the lack of silicate in the water. Plankton results from each cruise are analyzed for spatial and temporal distribution and correlated to seasonal nutrient data. Preliminary results suggest a shift in the phytoplankton assemblage.