Abstract Title

Session S-04G: Using Cross-Sectoral Collaboration to Create Long-Lasting Solutions

Presenter/Author Information

Michelle Connor, ForterraFollow

Keywords

Planning Assessment & Communication

Location

Room 6E

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Since the launch of the Cascade and Olympic Agendas in 2005, Forterra (formerly Cascade Land Conservancy) has been working to cross the urban-rural divide to generate equitable, market-based strategies for Creating Great Communities & Conserving Great Lands. Based on the premise that the NW's greatest opportunities for sustainability requires identification of synergies and constituencies across diverse sectors, Forterra has focused on a number of policy and project initiatives to test and prove up this premise. Examples include: the well-advanced Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program and an emerging collaboration to generate manufacturing of and building code authorizations for locally-sourced engineered and mass timber for use in multi-story buildings. Both of these examples align urban and rural market forces to create compact, carbon-reducing development, while sustaining resource economies, rural communities and the landscape - all of which are critical to the survival of the Salish Sea

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May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Using cross-sectoral collaboration to create long-lasting solutions: How Implementation of the Cascade and Olympic Agendas Seeks to Cross the Urban-Rural Divide

Room 6E

Since the launch of the Cascade and Olympic Agendas in 2005, Forterra (formerly Cascade Land Conservancy) has been working to cross the urban-rural divide to generate equitable, market-based strategies for Creating Great Communities & Conserving Great Lands. Based on the premise that the NW's greatest opportunities for sustainability requires identification of synergies and constituencies across diverse sectors, Forterra has focused on a number of policy and project initiatives to test and prove up this premise. Examples include: the well-advanced Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program and an emerging collaboration to generate manufacturing of and building code authorizations for locally-sourced engineered and mass timber for use in multi-story buildings. Both of these examples align urban and rural market forces to create compact, carbon-reducing development, while sustaining resource economies, rural communities and the landscape - all of which are critical to the survival of the Salish Sea