Abstract Title

Session S-04H: Technical Tools to Support Sea Level Rise Adaptation in the Salish Sea

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

The web-based Puget Sound Coastal Resilience Tool integrates new high resolution topographic LiDAR and nearshore bathymetry with current dynamic water level measurements and future scenarios to assess coastal habitat, infrastructure and community vulnerability to the joint occurrence of sea level rise, river flooding, storm surge, and wave impacts. Working with a diverse set of communities, metrics have been developed and mapped to help decision makers evaluate and detect areas of vulnerability and resilience and opportunities for adaptive management. Metrics measuring extent, change, and frequency of impact of estuary and nearshore habitat and infrastructure, particularly in the agricultural sector, are projected out to the year 2100 helping to identify vulnerable settings that likely provide mutual benefits to ecosystem restoration and coastal hazard mitigation. Initial model outputs focus on habitat, ecosystem restoration projects, and infrastructure within the footprints of the Nooksack, Skagit-Padilla-Samish, Stillaguamish, Snohomish, Nisqually and Skokomish Deltas. However, outputs along nearby shorelines and beach systems help to inform decisions aimed at protecting and restoring habitats that support outmigrating salmon, shellfish harvest and access, forage fish spawning beaches and cultural resources particularly vulnerable where shoreline armoring will constrain nearshore processes and shoreline migration.

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May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

The Puget Sound Coastal Resilience Tool: Metrics and models to assess vulnerability and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems

Room 607

The web-based Puget Sound Coastal Resilience Tool integrates new high resolution topographic LiDAR and nearshore bathymetry with current dynamic water level measurements and future scenarios to assess coastal habitat, infrastructure and community vulnerability to the joint occurrence of sea level rise, river flooding, storm surge, and wave impacts. Working with a diverse set of communities, metrics have been developed and mapped to help decision makers evaluate and detect areas of vulnerability and resilience and opportunities for adaptive management. Metrics measuring extent, change, and frequency of impact of estuary and nearshore habitat and infrastructure, particularly in the agricultural sector, are projected out to the year 2100 helping to identify vulnerable settings that likely provide mutual benefits to ecosystem restoration and coastal hazard mitigation. Initial model outputs focus on habitat, ecosystem restoration projects, and infrastructure within the footprints of the Nooksack, Skagit-Padilla-Samish, Stillaguamish, Snohomish, Nisqually and Skokomish Deltas. However, outputs along nearby shorelines and beach systems help to inform decisions aimed at protecting and restoring habitats that support outmigrating salmon, shellfish harvest and access, forage fish spawning beaches and cultural resources particularly vulnerable where shoreline armoring will constrain nearshore processes and shoreline migration.