Abstract Title

Session S-10B: Cleaning Our Waters: Moving Forward on Green Infrastructure

Keywords

Stormwater

Location

Room 608-609

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

In the 1960's shell fishing was abandoned in Dyes Inlet due to ongoing fecal pollution problems. In 1994 a stable and ongoing water quality monitoring program was established and identified polluted streams and near shore areas whereby a cooperative watershed effort resulted in numerous pollution correction projects. These efforts resulted in reclassification and upgrade of 1,500 acres of shellfish beds in 2003. However, polluted stormwater from the urban area of Silverdale has the potential to threaten the shellfish beds. Polluted stormwater was reduced by removing non-stormwater discharges from dumpster areas, enhancing road right of way storm system maintenance and working cooperatively with the commercial property owners for maintenance compliance. Although water quality was improved, the marine stations in northern Dyes Inlet continue to fail Part 2 of the fecal coliform standard. Retrofitting the stormwater system was the next logical step and focusing on treating runoff with infiltrative practices. In 2011 Kitsap County performed a stormwater retrofit planning project. The soils and existing stormwater treatment level was mapped, opportunity areas identified and prioritized, and pre-design reports of the top projects were produced. The presentation will focus on the retrofit plan and progress implementing projects as well as the relationship to water quality in the major streams and the marine waters of Dyes Inlet. Projects in development for retrofit include green infrastructure techniques such as installing Filterras® in an area with a high amount of utility conflicts, a stormwater treatment wetland whereby a partnership with the commercial properties is essential, and a boulevard area with highly infiltrative soils and the opportunity to enhance the area for non-motorized travel.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Retrofitting an Urban Watershed to Protect Shellfish Beds

Room 608-609

In the 1960's shell fishing was abandoned in Dyes Inlet due to ongoing fecal pollution problems. In 1994 a stable and ongoing water quality monitoring program was established and identified polluted streams and near shore areas whereby a cooperative watershed effort resulted in numerous pollution correction projects. These efforts resulted in reclassification and upgrade of 1,500 acres of shellfish beds in 2003. However, polluted stormwater from the urban area of Silverdale has the potential to threaten the shellfish beds. Polluted stormwater was reduced by removing non-stormwater discharges from dumpster areas, enhancing road right of way storm system maintenance and working cooperatively with the commercial property owners for maintenance compliance. Although water quality was improved, the marine stations in northern Dyes Inlet continue to fail Part 2 of the fecal coliform standard. Retrofitting the stormwater system was the next logical step and focusing on treating runoff with infiltrative practices. In 2011 Kitsap County performed a stormwater retrofit planning project. The soils and existing stormwater treatment level was mapped, opportunity areas identified and prioritized, and pre-design reports of the top projects were produced. The presentation will focus on the retrofit plan and progress implementing projects as well as the relationship to water quality in the major streams and the marine waters of Dyes Inlet. Projects in development for retrofit include green infrastructure techniques such as installing Filterras® in an area with a high amount of utility conflicts, a stormwater treatment wetland whereby a partnership with the commercial properties is essential, and a boulevard area with highly infiltrative soils and the opportunity to enhance the area for non-motorized travel.