Abstract Title

Session S-10C: Spill Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Issues in the Salish Sea and Pacific Northwest

Keywords

Emerging Contaminants and Emergencies

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Commercial vessel traffic through the shared waters of Washington and British Columbia is projected to increase over the next decade—rising by approximately 25% if a set of proposed projects are completed (e.g., Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project, Gateway Pacific Terminal, and several in Port Metro Vancouver). In 2013 the Puget Sound Partnership and Makah Tribe partnered with professional mariners and other stakeholders from the Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee to significantly update a George Washington and Virginia Commonwealth University vessel traffic risk assessment (VTRA) study for the Sound. Using vessel tracks recorded in 2010 by the US and Canadian Coast Guards, the VTRA depicts the baseline in oil spill risk and the magnitude and geographic extent of changes in relative risk associated with the set of potential ‘What If’ projects above. The maritime risk assessment follows a participatory model based on the “collaborative analysis” method (Busenberg 1999, Weible 2008). Based on the results of the ‘What If’ simulations, the VTRA stakeholders requested the researchers model several risk mitigation measures (e.g., reducing vessel speed, adding supplemental tug escorts, etc.) to evaluate the potential effectiveness of each in reducing relative risk in the system as a whole –and in specific waterways. This talk will summarize those results and outline current (and anticipated) collaborative efforts to proactively manage vessel traffic risk in this trans-boundary region over the immediate and longer-term.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Collaborative Efforts to Pinpoint, Quantify and Proactively Manage Risk Through a Comprehensive Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment for Puget Sound

Room 606

Commercial vessel traffic through the shared waters of Washington and British Columbia is projected to increase over the next decade—rising by approximately 25% if a set of proposed projects are completed (e.g., Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project, Gateway Pacific Terminal, and several in Port Metro Vancouver). In 2013 the Puget Sound Partnership and Makah Tribe partnered with professional mariners and other stakeholders from the Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee to significantly update a George Washington and Virginia Commonwealth University vessel traffic risk assessment (VTRA) study for the Sound. Using vessel tracks recorded in 2010 by the US and Canadian Coast Guards, the VTRA depicts the baseline in oil spill risk and the magnitude and geographic extent of changes in relative risk associated with the set of potential ‘What If’ projects above. The maritime risk assessment follows a participatory model based on the “collaborative analysis” method (Busenberg 1999, Weible 2008). Based on the results of the ‘What If’ simulations, the VTRA stakeholders requested the researchers model several risk mitigation measures (e.g., reducing vessel speed, adding supplemental tug escorts, etc.) to evaluate the potential effectiveness of each in reducing relative risk in the system as a whole –and in specific waterways. This talk will summarize those results and outline current (and anticipated) collaborative efforts to proactively manage vessel traffic risk in this trans-boundary region over the immediate and longer-term.