Abstract Title

Session S-10C: Spill Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Issues in the Salish Sea and Pacific Northwest

Keywords

Emerging Contaminants and Emergencies

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

The risk of oil spills from existing oil infrastructure and transport presents a threat to aboriginal environmental and cultural values. First Nations can play a significant role in oil spill response to protect those resources. In this presentation, the authors summarize the Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s involvement in this area and provide recommendations for developing capacity and maximizing effectiveness of First Nations’ participation in oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Prevention: First Nations should have the opportunity for consultation with provincial and federal regulatory agencies to ensure standards are adopted that reduce to the maximum extent possible the risk of spill incidents within their traditional territories. Preparedness: First Nations can work with response organizations to ensure that important environmental and cultural values, such as archaeological sites, are designated high priority for protection in geographic response plans. First Nations might also develop their own Incident Management policies or procedures to guide their involvement in the Incident Command System during a spill event. These initiatives should be scalable and include the capacity to address worst case scenario spills. Response: First Nations have human resources available for training and employment often in isolated or key areas; reserve land might also available for pre-siting equipment and supplies. First Nations and their local or traditional knowledge also have a key role to play in shoreline assessments, particularly when archaeological or cultural resources are present. Recovery: clean-up standards need to take into account First Nation priorities because of their reliance on local natural resources for sustenance, ceremonial and economic purposes. Standards should also be set high enough to provide net environmental benefit at the end of any recovery period. Developing the capacity for First Nation involvement in oil spill response as described in this presentation will require financial support from industry or government. Such support will provide for a more robust, effective system for oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and recovery.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

The role of First Nations in oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and recovery in British Columbia

Room 606

The risk of oil spills from existing oil infrastructure and transport presents a threat to aboriginal environmental and cultural values. First Nations can play a significant role in oil spill response to protect those resources. In this presentation, the authors summarize the Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s involvement in this area and provide recommendations for developing capacity and maximizing effectiveness of First Nations’ participation in oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Prevention: First Nations should have the opportunity for consultation with provincial and federal regulatory agencies to ensure standards are adopted that reduce to the maximum extent possible the risk of spill incidents within their traditional territories. Preparedness: First Nations can work with response organizations to ensure that important environmental and cultural values, such as archaeological sites, are designated high priority for protection in geographic response plans. First Nations might also develop their own Incident Management policies or procedures to guide their involvement in the Incident Command System during a spill event. These initiatives should be scalable and include the capacity to address worst case scenario spills. Response: First Nations have human resources available for training and employment often in isolated or key areas; reserve land might also available for pre-siting equipment and supplies. First Nations and their local or traditional knowledge also have a key role to play in shoreline assessments, particularly when archaeological or cultural resources are present. Recovery: clean-up standards need to take into account First Nation priorities because of their reliance on local natural resources for sustenance, ceremonial and economic purposes. Standards should also be set high enough to provide net environmental benefit at the end of any recovery period. Developing the capacity for First Nation involvement in oil spill response as described in this presentation will require financial support from industry or government. Such support will provide for a more robust, effective system for oil spill prevention, preparedness, response and recovery.