Abstract Title

Session S-10D: Cross-Habitat Linkages and Landscape Scale Approaches to Ecosystem Management

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Location

Room 611-612

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Land cover change is associated with human development is one of the most important indirect stressors in the Salish Sea Ecosystem, and is a Vital Sings indicator for the Puget Sound Partnership. In January 2014, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife completed the first iteration of the Puget Sound land cover change map covering the 2006-2009 time period. The map was created from 1-m National Agriculture Imagery Program aerial imagery using a hybrid data mining-photo interpretation process developed for mapping change with high resolution imagery. The map depicts over 36,000 individual change events covering over 85,000 acres throughout the basin, and represents one of the largest area, highest-resolution change maps ever created. The process we employed includes reviewing every change location to remove commission error while omission error was assessed using a more traditional sampling approach applied to non-change areas. Additionally, at each location the initial land cover, change agent (development, forestry, natural, etc.), total change area, canopy reduction and increase in impervious and semipervious surface were quantified during the photo interpretation step. The median change event was smaller than one acre, which is too small to be reliably assessed using intermediate resolution remote sensing data like LandSat. The spatial precision of the map provides a robust base layer for intersection analyses with other data sets such as riparian buffers, urban and planned growth area boundaries, mapped wetlands, mapped ownership, land-use, parcels. From these intersections, change rates can be calculated by area of interest. Sound-wide results will be presented along with information on obtaining the data and examples of potential analyses.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

The 2006-2009 Puget Sound Land-Use/Land-Cover Change Map

Room 611-612

Land cover change is associated with human development is one of the most important indirect stressors in the Salish Sea Ecosystem, and is a Vital Sings indicator for the Puget Sound Partnership. In January 2014, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife completed the first iteration of the Puget Sound land cover change map covering the 2006-2009 time period. The map was created from 1-m National Agriculture Imagery Program aerial imagery using a hybrid data mining-photo interpretation process developed for mapping change with high resolution imagery. The map depicts over 36,000 individual change events covering over 85,000 acres throughout the basin, and represents one of the largest area, highest-resolution change maps ever created. The process we employed includes reviewing every change location to remove commission error while omission error was assessed using a more traditional sampling approach applied to non-change areas. Additionally, at each location the initial land cover, change agent (development, forestry, natural, etc.), total change area, canopy reduction and increase in impervious and semipervious surface were quantified during the photo interpretation step. The median change event was smaller than one acre, which is too small to be reliably assessed using intermediate resolution remote sensing data like LandSat. The spatial precision of the map provides a robust base layer for intersection analyses with other data sets such as riparian buffers, urban and planned growth area boundaries, mapped wetlands, mapped ownership, land-use, parcels. From these intersections, change rates can be calculated by area of interest. Sound-wide results will be presented along with information on obtaining the data and examples of potential analyses.