Abstract Title

Session S-10E: Evaluation, Conservation and Restoration of Species Associated with High-Relief, Rocky Habitat in the Salish Sea

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Location

Room 613-614

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Empirical data on recruitment and dispersal patterns of marine species can provide a scientific basis for conserving biodiversity and improving fisheries via marine reserves. We examined patterns of larval dispersal in brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus) using genetic markers (microsatellites). Tissue samples from 1,837 fish were collected in 2004 to 2009 from 18 sites in the Puget Sound, Washington. Genetic parentage analysis using maximum-likelihood and exclusion approaches identified seven offspring that assigned to a parent, with one offspring assigned to both parents. All offspring recruited and settled at the main study site, Point Heyer; four offspring originated from parents resident at Point Heyer and three from other locations 8 km to 20 km away. Kinship and population genetic structure analyses provided little evidence to reject the null hypothesis of panmixia, suggesting that recruitment to Point Heyer is largely random and that brown rockfish may be highly connected via dispersal in the south Puget Sound. In contrast to previous rockfish studies, there was no evidence for high variance in reproductive success from comparisons of heterozygosity and relatedness among samples of adults and Point Heyer recruits. These results indicate that random recruitment and high levels of gene flow are the predominant processes shaping patterns of brown rockfish larval dispersal in Puget Sound.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

High connectivity among brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus) populations in Puget Sound: evidence from genetic parental identification, otolith microchemistry and oceanographic models

Room 613-614

Empirical data on recruitment and dispersal patterns of marine species can provide a scientific basis for conserving biodiversity and improving fisheries via marine reserves. We examined patterns of larval dispersal in brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus) using genetic markers (microsatellites). Tissue samples from 1,837 fish were collected in 2004 to 2009 from 18 sites in the Puget Sound, Washington. Genetic parentage analysis using maximum-likelihood and exclusion approaches identified seven offspring that assigned to a parent, with one offspring assigned to both parents. All offspring recruited and settled at the main study site, Point Heyer; four offspring originated from parents resident at Point Heyer and three from other locations 8 km to 20 km away. Kinship and population genetic structure analyses provided little evidence to reject the null hypothesis of panmixia, suggesting that recruitment to Point Heyer is largely random and that brown rockfish may be highly connected via dispersal in the south Puget Sound. In contrast to previous rockfish studies, there was no evidence for high variance in reproductive success from comparisons of heterozygosity and relatedness among samples of adults and Point Heyer recruits. These results indicate that random recruitment and high levels of gene flow are the predominant processes shaping patterns of brown rockfish larval dispersal in Puget Sound.