Abstract Title

Session S-10H: Salish Sea Foods: Cultural Practices, Sustainable Markets, and Environmental Stewardship

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

The Salish Sea’s natural resources have supported the diet and culture of First Nations for millennia. In the last two centuries, newcomers have intensively utilized those same resources to support rapidly expanding population and development. For many, recreational and cultural uses of marine and shoreline plants and animals have been an effective way to connect to the land while supplementing diet or hobbies. Such interests are not unique to inhabitants of the Salish Sea region. For foragers, hunters, and fishers who arrive in our region, understanding recreational harvest opportunities, regulations and health considerations can be daunting. In addition, historical and cultural connections and impacts of harvest and development may of special consideration. In response to needs expressed by volunteers in naturalist programs and objectives of Washington Sea Grant, a program to encourage well-informed recreational harvest and use of marine and shoreline resources is being developed with input from potential participants and will be piloted in 2014. The program will provide seasonal short courses and harvest opportunities and enhance information provided by Washington Fish and Wildlife and other agencies. Evaluation of the pilot will consider the need and applicability of recreational harvest outreach in other areas of the Salish Sea.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Encouraging safe and responsible recreational harvest of Salish Sea marine and shoreline resources

Room 607

The Salish Sea’s natural resources have supported the diet and culture of First Nations for millennia. In the last two centuries, newcomers have intensively utilized those same resources to support rapidly expanding population and development. For many, recreational and cultural uses of marine and shoreline plants and animals have been an effective way to connect to the land while supplementing diet or hobbies. Such interests are not unique to inhabitants of the Salish Sea region. For foragers, hunters, and fishers who arrive in our region, understanding recreational harvest opportunities, regulations and health considerations can be daunting. In addition, historical and cultural connections and impacts of harvest and development may of special consideration. In response to needs expressed by volunteers in naturalist programs and objectives of Washington Sea Grant, a program to encourage well-informed recreational harvest and use of marine and shoreline resources is being developed with input from potential participants and will be piloted in 2014. The program will provide seasonal short courses and harvest opportunities and enhance information provided by Washington Fish and Wildlife and other agencies. Evaluation of the pilot will consider the need and applicability of recreational harvest outreach in other areas of the Salish Sea.