Abstract Title

Session S-10H: Salish Sea Foods: Cultural Practices, Sustainable Markets, and Environmental Stewardship

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

The Salish Sea supports diverse seafood practices. Noted for its commercial fishing activities, the Salish Sea also supports important cultural, subsistence, and noncommercial food systems. Incidental by-catch, seafood waste products, culturally-important species, and other seafood with little commercial value (i.e. “trash fish”) might play a key role in addressing hunger and food insecurity, as well as support social and cultural practices. This paper discusses noncommercial wild ocean food practices through a focus on subsistence use and food recovery networks (i.e. "gleaning" efforts). For example, between 1990 to 2010 vessel landings in Puget Sound ports recorded over 30 million pounds of fish and shellfish being kept for personal use. Elsewhere, chum carcass discards were diverted from Salish waters to regional food banks as a novel approach for utilizing lower-value salmon species for emergency food security. Other examples include incidental by-catch utilization in regional food systems. This oral presentation analyzes mixed socioeconomic datasets: (1) quantitative data on personal use by Puget Sound commercial harvesters; (2) qualitative data using open-ended interviews with key individuals involved in (a) seafood recovery through food bank donations, and (b) by-catch utilization.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Seafood subsistence, fish recovery, and informal livelihood dimensions of Salish food species

Room 607

The Salish Sea supports diverse seafood practices. Noted for its commercial fishing activities, the Salish Sea also supports important cultural, subsistence, and noncommercial food systems. Incidental by-catch, seafood waste products, culturally-important species, and other seafood with little commercial value (i.e. “trash fish”) might play a key role in addressing hunger and food insecurity, as well as support social and cultural practices. This paper discusses noncommercial wild ocean food practices through a focus on subsistence use and food recovery networks (i.e. "gleaning" efforts). For example, between 1990 to 2010 vessel landings in Puget Sound ports recorded over 30 million pounds of fish and shellfish being kept for personal use. Elsewhere, chum carcass discards were diverted from Salish waters to regional food banks as a novel approach for utilizing lower-value salmon species for emergency food security. Other examples include incidental by-catch utilization in regional food systems. This oral presentation analyzes mixed socioeconomic datasets: (1) quantitative data on personal use by Puget Sound commercial harvesters; (2) qualitative data using open-ended interviews with key individuals involved in (a) seafood recovery through food bank donations, and (b) by-catch utilization.