Abstract Title

Session S-08D: Salmon Recovery: Implementation and Progress I

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Location

Room 611-612

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

The Qwuloolt restoration site is approximately 150 hectares of former estuarine wetland in the Snohomish River system that will have tidal inundation returned via levee breach in late 2015. Qwuloolt is one of several large restoration projects planned for the Snohomish River estuary in the next decade for recovery of salmon and other biota, which together could restore several thousand acres and constitute one of the most significant restoration efforts in Puget Sound. In 2008 we began development and implementation of a comprehensive monitoring plan for Qwuloolt that evaluates a broad suite of abiotic and biotic attributes (e.g., land forms, hydrology, and chemistry; taxonomic composition of plant, invertebrate, fish, and bird assemblages). Four years of pre-breach data document clear contrasts between Qwuloolt and adjacent reference sites. Qwuloolt is subsided, hydrologically isolated, and its biota composed of relatively few species and dominated by nonnative, freshwater species. These results provide an invaluable foundation for scientifically rigorous post-breach evaluation of project performance, and contribute to estuary-wide understanding of cumulative effects of restoration and basic estuarine ecology of Puget Sound.

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Pre-project monitoring of the Qwuloolt restoration in the Snohomish River Estuary

Room 611-612

The Qwuloolt restoration site is approximately 150 hectares of former estuarine wetland in the Snohomish River system that will have tidal inundation returned via levee breach in late 2015. Qwuloolt is one of several large restoration projects planned for the Snohomish River estuary in the next decade for recovery of salmon and other biota, which together could restore several thousand acres and constitute one of the most significant restoration efforts in Puget Sound. In 2008 we began development and implementation of a comprehensive monitoring plan for Qwuloolt that evaluates a broad suite of abiotic and biotic attributes (e.g., land forms, hydrology, and chemistry; taxonomic composition of plant, invertebrate, fish, and bird assemblages). Four years of pre-breach data document clear contrasts between Qwuloolt and adjacent reference sites. Qwuloolt is subsided, hydrologically isolated, and its biota composed of relatively few species and dominated by nonnative, freshwater species. These results provide an invaluable foundation for scientifically rigorous post-breach evaluation of project performance, and contribute to estuary-wide understanding of cumulative effects of restoration and basic estuarine ecology of Puget Sound.