Abstract Title

Session S-08G: Rethinking Our Waterways: Effective Collaboration with Landowners, Project Partners and Decision Makers

Proposed Abstract Title

Controlling Japanese Knotweed in the Samish River Watershed- building partnerships with landowners to restore riparian function

Presenter/Author Information

Todd Woodard, Samish Indian NationFollow

Keywords

Shorelines

Location

Room 6E

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

The Samish Indian Nation's Department of Natural resources has been working to fight Japanese Knotweed infestations in the entire Samish River Watershed for the past 3 years. We have successfully worked with a variety of landowners to survey the extent of infestations and initiate a comprehensive invasive control project. We have involved additional project partners such as Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group and leveraged additional funding sources to restore native plant populations and riparian function where knotweed has been removed. To date, nearly 90 acres of knotweed has been treated and 30 acres of riparian zone are scheduled to be replanted with native diverse plant species. This presentation will detail the project overall focusing on how to build landowner participation in a watershed that is very important from a salmonid production standpoint as well as an agricultural and private landowner perspective.

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Controlling Japanese Knotweed in the Samish River Watershed- building partnerships with landowners to restore riparian function

Room 6E

The Samish Indian Nation's Department of Natural resources has been working to fight Japanese Knotweed infestations in the entire Samish River Watershed for the past 3 years. We have successfully worked with a variety of landowners to survey the extent of infestations and initiate a comprehensive invasive control project. We have involved additional project partners such as Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group and leveraged additional funding sources to restore native plant populations and riparian function where knotweed has been removed. To date, nearly 90 acres of knotweed has been treated and 30 acres of riparian zone are scheduled to be replanted with native diverse plant species. This presentation will detail the project overall focusing on how to build landowner participation in a watershed that is very important from a salmonid production standpoint as well as an agricultural and private landowner perspective.