Abstract Title

Session S-08G: Rethinking Our Waterways: Effective Collaboration with Landowners, Project Partners and Decision Makers

Keywords

Shorelines

Location

Room 6E

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

When Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were listed as threatened, in 1998, under the Endangered Species Act, citizens, tribes, and local governments in Washington State began developing and implementing the first bottom-up species recovery plan in U.S. history. This coordinated effort created the opportunity to study a place-based, collaborative approach to natural resource management. Utilizing interviews and primary documents, this case study explores the organizational structures and collaborative processes of watershed level organizations, Lead Entities, that are tasked with bringing together diverse groups of stakeholders to develop local salmon habitat recovery strategies. The robust data reveals a myriad of inter-related factors that influence collaborative processes within Lead Entities. These factors include the variation in physical and social landscapes Lead Entities exist within. Factors common among Lead Entities were also revealed in the data analysis, such as collaborative relationships, trust, communication, conflict, and conflict resolution. This study’s findings and recommendations contribute to the field of collaborative natural resource management, which focuses on creating management approaches that pool knowledge and resources from diverse groups to create management plans that are more applicable and resilient because they are formed through inclusive, collaborative processes. Furthermore, this case study contributes data for use in the current transformation of the field of natural resource management. This transformation is characterized by a paradigm shift that moves away from identifying and addressing natural resource issues from a purely natural and physical science lens and towards the recognition that effective resource management outcomes are dependent on our ability to work together collaboratively.

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Building the Platform for Collaborative Natural Resource Management: A Case Study of Human Dimensions in Puget Sound Salmon Recovery

Room 6E

When Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were listed as threatened, in 1998, under the Endangered Species Act, citizens, tribes, and local governments in Washington State began developing and implementing the first bottom-up species recovery plan in U.S. history. This coordinated effort created the opportunity to study a place-based, collaborative approach to natural resource management. Utilizing interviews and primary documents, this case study explores the organizational structures and collaborative processes of watershed level organizations, Lead Entities, that are tasked with bringing together diverse groups of stakeholders to develop local salmon habitat recovery strategies. The robust data reveals a myriad of inter-related factors that influence collaborative processes within Lead Entities. These factors include the variation in physical and social landscapes Lead Entities exist within. Factors common among Lead Entities were also revealed in the data analysis, such as collaborative relationships, trust, communication, conflict, and conflict resolution. This study’s findings and recommendations contribute to the field of collaborative natural resource management, which focuses on creating management approaches that pool knowledge and resources from diverse groups to create management plans that are more applicable and resilient because they are formed through inclusive, collaborative processes. Furthermore, this case study contributes data for use in the current transformation of the field of natural resource management. This transformation is characterized by a paradigm shift that moves away from identifying and addressing natural resource issues from a purely natural and physical science lens and towards the recognition that effective resource management outcomes are dependent on our ability to work together collaboratively.