Abstract Title

Session S-08A: Harmful Algal Blooms, Climate, Shellfish, and Public Health - Emerging Issues in a Changing World

Keywords

Harmful Algal Blooms and Shellfish

Location

Room 615-616-617

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strains isolated from the U.S. Pacific Northwest demonstrate that clinical isolates are genetically distinct from the environmental isolates. Several environmental isolates are clonally related to strains that have been responsible for Vp-related illnesses world-wide (the pandemic complex) but have not been responsible for illnesses in the Pacific Northwest. While both clinical and a significant proportion of environmental isolates encode one of the putative virulence markers, the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), clinical isolates also encoded a second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). Our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus isolates from the Pacific Northwest encoding trh are more likely to be pathogenic than isolates encoding tdh alone.

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus reveals distinct differences in strains from the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.

Room 615-616-617

Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strains isolated from the U.S. Pacific Northwest demonstrate that clinical isolates are genetically distinct from the environmental isolates. Several environmental isolates are clonally related to strains that have been responsible for Vp-related illnesses world-wide (the pandemic complex) but have not been responsible for illnesses in the Pacific Northwest. While both clinical and a significant proportion of environmental isolates encode one of the putative virulence markers, the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), clinical isolates also encoded a second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). Our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus isolates from the Pacific Northwest encoding trh are more likely to be pathogenic than isolates encoding tdh alone.