Abstract Title

Session S-08H: Incentives, Guidance and Collaboration for Greener Shorelines

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 607

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Description

A unique partnership between private and public entities has enabled the enhancement of valuable shoreline habitat on three acres of waterfront property located in South Lake Washington. This property is located 400 meters east of the Cedar River, a major tributary to Lake Washington. The proximity to the Cedar River is an important feature of this site because threatened out-migrating Puget Sound Chinook salmon use shorelines close to the mouth of the Cedar River for rearing. The shores of Lake Washington are a vital nursery ground for salmon, however most of this shoreline habitat has been altered with overwater structures, bank armoring, and the reduction of overhanging native vegetation. At the project site a steel sheet pile wall runs for over 500 feet along the shoreline. Concrete debris is scattered in the water, piles leach creosote, and stormwater flows into the nearshore. The project design creates shallow water habitat with overhanging vegetation and will improve water quality along the shoreline. Habitat enhancements will be constructed this summer and are a product of collaboration between public agencies and private entities. Partnerships have developed between WADNR, WSDOT, Boeing, DOE, RCO, and USFWS. This presentation will look at how entities with different program goals can come together to design an important shoreline enhancement while at the same time benefiting their directives. For example, Boeing will gain new infrastructure when their stormwater outfalls are moved into deeper water, improving shallow water habitat for salmon. Moreover, WSDOT will receive mitigation credit for funding the construction of the project, providing WADNR the additional funds needed to move past the design phase and construct the project. Developing these partnerships takes time and effort; the reward is design and construction of the largest shoreline enhancement project in South Lake Washington. This project strives to be an example of successful partnerships and to encourage future collaborative restoration efforts between public and private entities.

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Enhancing Lake Washington shoreline through unique collaborations

Room 607

A unique partnership between private and public entities has enabled the enhancement of valuable shoreline habitat on three acres of waterfront property located in South Lake Washington. This property is located 400 meters east of the Cedar River, a major tributary to Lake Washington. The proximity to the Cedar River is an important feature of this site because threatened out-migrating Puget Sound Chinook salmon use shorelines close to the mouth of the Cedar River for rearing. The shores of Lake Washington are a vital nursery ground for salmon, however most of this shoreline habitat has been altered with overwater structures, bank armoring, and the reduction of overhanging native vegetation. At the project site a steel sheet pile wall runs for over 500 feet along the shoreline. Concrete debris is scattered in the water, piles leach creosote, and stormwater flows into the nearshore. The project design creates shallow water habitat with overhanging vegetation and will improve water quality along the shoreline. Habitat enhancements will be constructed this summer and are a product of collaboration between public agencies and private entities. Partnerships have developed between WADNR, WSDOT, Boeing, DOE, RCO, and USFWS. This presentation will look at how entities with different program goals can come together to design an important shoreline enhancement while at the same time benefiting their directives. For example, Boeing will gain new infrastructure when their stormwater outfalls are moved into deeper water, improving shallow water habitat for salmon. Moreover, WSDOT will receive mitigation credit for funding the construction of the project, providing WADNR the additional funds needed to move past the design phase and construct the project. Developing these partnerships takes time and effort; the reward is design and construction of the largest shoreline enhancement project in South Lake Washington. This project strives to be an example of successful partnerships and to encourage future collaborative restoration efforts between public and private entities.