Abstract Title

Session S-09A: Harmful Algal Blooms, Climate, Shellfish, and Public Health - Emerging Issues in a Changing World

Presenter/Author Information

Annie Cox

Keywords

Harmful Algal Blooms and Shellfish

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Current methods for detection of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and bacteria that contaminate shellfish or cause fish kills are time consuming and labor intensive. Shellfish closures often occur after harvest or are prompted by human illness reports, all reactive management decisions. The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) offers timely, quantitative, in-situ detection capabilities by filtering water samples and analyzing them onboard to detect specific HAB and bacterial species using DNA and RNA-based technologies. In summer 2013, four ESPs were deployed for ~60 days total at a tribal shellfish and finfish hatchery in Lummi Bay and a commercial shellfish farm in Samish Bay. The main objective was to assess ESP-enabled detection of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and pathogens in support of proactive fisheries management efforts. The devices were configured to sample daily and detect Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. (HAB organisms) at both locations, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (bacterial pathogen) along with two microbial source-tracking indicators in Samish Bay. Validation samples were taken periodically to confirm ESP data. Biomass samples were archived daily for subsequent nucleic acid extraction and community composition profiling using molecular bar coding methods. The fish-killing algae, H. akashiwo, was intermittently detected at the Lummi Bay site at low densities confirming the ESP’s ability to detect HAB species at low cell densities before they are able to contaminate or harm shellfish and finfish and threaten public health or economic interests. This ability makes the ESP a useful tool for early warning of HAB events.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Environmental Sample Processor Monitoring of Harmful Algae and Bacterial Pathogens at Aquaculture Sites in Puget Sound

Room 615-616-617

Current methods for detection of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and bacteria that contaminate shellfish or cause fish kills are time consuming and labor intensive. Shellfish closures often occur after harvest or are prompted by human illness reports, all reactive management decisions. The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) offers timely, quantitative, in-situ detection capabilities by filtering water samples and analyzing them onboard to detect specific HAB and bacterial species using DNA and RNA-based technologies. In summer 2013, four ESPs were deployed for ~60 days total at a tribal shellfish and finfish hatchery in Lummi Bay and a commercial shellfish farm in Samish Bay. The main objective was to assess ESP-enabled detection of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and pathogens in support of proactive fisheries management efforts. The devices were configured to sample daily and detect Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. (HAB organisms) at both locations, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (bacterial pathogen) along with two microbial source-tracking indicators in Samish Bay. Validation samples were taken periodically to confirm ESP data. Biomass samples were archived daily for subsequent nucleic acid extraction and community composition profiling using molecular bar coding methods. The fish-killing algae, H. akashiwo, was intermittently detected at the Lummi Bay site at low densities confirming the ESP’s ability to detect HAB species at low cell densities before they are able to contaminate or harm shellfish and finfish and threaten public health or economic interests. This ability makes the ESP a useful tool for early warning of HAB events.