Abstract Title

Session S-09B: Bioretention for Improving Water Quality

Proposed Abstract Title

Next Steps for Bioretention Media Research

Keywords

Stormwater

Location

Room 608-609

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

While bioretention can provide very good water quality treatment for many contaminants (e.g. sediment, zinc, hydrocarbons, and likely bacteria), regional and national research indicates nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and copper (Cu) may be exported from these systems (Geosyntec 2013; Herrera 2012; Jonasson et al. 2010; Trowsdale and Simcock 2011). Herrera Environmental Consultants will be leading a new effort that will support continued coordination among State and local jurisdictions that are developing and implementing bioretention systems. The purpose of this project is to better understand and improve bioretention soil media performance for capture and retention of N, P, and Cu while retaining the current high level of water quality treatment performance for other stormwater pollutants of concern demonstrated in regional bioretention media research. Specific bioretention soil media (BSM) analyses will begin with leaching tests performed on individual media components to determine P, N, and Cu export potential. This data and findings from others studies will be considered in the selection of media for testing. The best performing individual components will be used to develop media blends that will be placed in laboratory columns. The media columns will first be flushed with clean water and effluent assessed for stormwater pollutants of concern. Semi-synthetic stormwater (actual stormwater spiked with added chemicals to more closely mimic expected inflow conditions) with targeted concentrations of contaminants will then be applied at specified rates and loads to determine the pollutant capture capability of the blends. Simultaneously, plant health will be examined to verify that the media blends can support healthy vegetation. These findings have broad regional application across all Phase I and II jurisdictions for application of new NPDES Permit requirements and for protecting freshwater resources in Washington and the Salish Sea.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Next Steps for Bioretention Media Research

Room 608-609

While bioretention can provide very good water quality treatment for many contaminants (e.g. sediment, zinc, hydrocarbons, and likely bacteria), regional and national research indicates nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and copper (Cu) may be exported from these systems (Geosyntec 2013; Herrera 2012; Jonasson et al. 2010; Trowsdale and Simcock 2011). Herrera Environmental Consultants will be leading a new effort that will support continued coordination among State and local jurisdictions that are developing and implementing bioretention systems. The purpose of this project is to better understand and improve bioretention soil media performance for capture and retention of N, P, and Cu while retaining the current high level of water quality treatment performance for other stormwater pollutants of concern demonstrated in regional bioretention media research. Specific bioretention soil media (BSM) analyses will begin with leaching tests performed on individual media components to determine P, N, and Cu export potential. This data and findings from others studies will be considered in the selection of media for testing. The best performing individual components will be used to develop media blends that will be placed in laboratory columns. The media columns will first be flushed with clean water and effluent assessed for stormwater pollutants of concern. Semi-synthetic stormwater (actual stormwater spiked with added chemicals to more closely mimic expected inflow conditions) with targeted concentrations of contaminants will then be applied at specified rates and loads to determine the pollutant capture capability of the blends. Simultaneously, plant health will be examined to verify that the media blends can support healthy vegetation. These findings have broad regional application across all Phase I and II jurisdictions for application of new NPDES Permit requirements and for protecting freshwater resources in Washington and the Salish Sea.