Abstract Title

Session S-09B: Bioretention for Improving Water Quality

Proposed Abstract Title

Water Quality Treatment Characteristics of Full-Scale Bioretention Systems with Various Media Blends

Keywords

Stormwater

Location

Room 608-609

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Washington State University (WSU) is testing various bioretention media blends at a low impact development (LID) research facility in western Washington. The conference presentation will provide a brief discussion of the facility design and then focus on the initial testing of the full-scale, replicated bioretention systems (with vegetation) to determine nutrient, metal and hydrocarbon and bacteria treatment capability. The bioretention component of the LID research facility includes twenty, full-scale replicated bioretention cells to test the: pollutant management capabilities of various soil mixes; long-term pollutant concentration trends in soils; plant growth and evapotranspiration performance; detailed hydraulic characteristics; and long-term infiltration rates influenced by various plant types and sediment loading regimes. Each cell is comprised of a 152 cm diameter tank filled with various soil media (61 cm deep) and planted with the same plant species. Each tank has an under-drain, flow monitoring instruments and water quality sampling equipment. Sixteen of the 20 cells are currently being tested (four soil media treatments replicated four times). The four media blends include: 1. 60% mineral aggregate and 40% compost by volume. 2. 80% mineral aggregate and 20% compost by volume. 3. 60% mineral aggregate, 30% compost, and 10% water treatment residuals by volume. 4. 60% mineral aggregate, 15% compost, 15% shredded cedar bark, and 10% water treatment residuals by volume. The soil media are experimental blends designed to optimize stormwater pollutant capture with particular attention to phosphate and nitrate management. Natural (lower pollutant concentrations) and synthetic stormwater (higher pollutant concentrations) are distributed to the cells. The water quality treatment part of the presentation will focus on the base-line testing of the bioretention media, treatment capability under leaching conditions (low pollutant concentrations) and treatment capability at higher pollutant concentrations.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Water Quality Treatment Characteristics of Full-Scale Bioretention Systems with Various Media Blends

Room 608-609

Washington State University (WSU) is testing various bioretention media blends at a low impact development (LID) research facility in western Washington. The conference presentation will provide a brief discussion of the facility design and then focus on the initial testing of the full-scale, replicated bioretention systems (with vegetation) to determine nutrient, metal and hydrocarbon and bacteria treatment capability. The bioretention component of the LID research facility includes twenty, full-scale replicated bioretention cells to test the: pollutant management capabilities of various soil mixes; long-term pollutant concentration trends in soils; plant growth and evapotranspiration performance; detailed hydraulic characteristics; and long-term infiltration rates influenced by various plant types and sediment loading regimes. Each cell is comprised of a 152 cm diameter tank filled with various soil media (61 cm deep) and planted with the same plant species. Each tank has an under-drain, flow monitoring instruments and water quality sampling equipment. Sixteen of the 20 cells are currently being tested (four soil media treatments replicated four times). The four media blends include: 1. 60% mineral aggregate and 40% compost by volume. 2. 80% mineral aggregate and 20% compost by volume. 3. 60% mineral aggregate, 30% compost, and 10% water treatment residuals by volume. 4. 60% mineral aggregate, 15% compost, 15% shredded cedar bark, and 10% water treatment residuals by volume. The soil media are experimental blends designed to optimize stormwater pollutant capture with particular attention to phosphate and nitrate management. Natural (lower pollutant concentrations) and synthetic stormwater (higher pollutant concentrations) are distributed to the cells. The water quality treatment part of the presentation will focus on the base-line testing of the bioretention media, treatment capability under leaching conditions (low pollutant concentrations) and treatment capability at higher pollutant concentrations.