Abstract Title

Session S-09B: Bioretention for Improving Water Quality

Keywords

Stormwater

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Stormwater runoff contains a complex mixture of contaminants including a wide variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), primarily from tire wear, road wear, and automobile exhaust. Many PAHs are acutely harmful to aquatic animals, resulting in cardiovascular toxicity and even death. To better understand the effects of complex mixtures of dissolved PAHs on aquatic animals, we simulated runoff events on an asphalt surface treated with a PAH-rich top dressing (coal tar based sealcoat) commonly applied in populous regions of the USA and Canada. Runoff was collected during simulated runoff events over three exposure periods separated by one-week intervals of natural weathering conditions. Runoff was both collected untreated and treated by filtering through experimental soil bioretention columns containing 60% sand : 40% compost. Juvenile coho salmon, zebrafish embryos, and the waterflea Ceriodaphnia dubia were exposed to untreated runoff or bioretention treated runoff and monitored for acute lethality and sublethal effects. Both the concentration of PAHs and toxicity to aquatic test animals decreased rapidly as a function of time since sealcoat application. For all exposure trials, bioretention treatment successfully reduced or eliminated lethal and sublethal effects of the PAH-rich sealcoat runoff.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Can bioretention treatment prevent toxicity in aquatic animals exposed to PAH-enriched stormwater runoff?

Room 608-609

Stormwater runoff contains a complex mixture of contaminants including a wide variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), primarily from tire wear, road wear, and automobile exhaust. Many PAHs are acutely harmful to aquatic animals, resulting in cardiovascular toxicity and even death. To better understand the effects of complex mixtures of dissolved PAHs on aquatic animals, we simulated runoff events on an asphalt surface treated with a PAH-rich top dressing (coal tar based sealcoat) commonly applied in populous regions of the USA and Canada. Runoff was collected during simulated runoff events over three exposure periods separated by one-week intervals of natural weathering conditions. Runoff was both collected untreated and treated by filtering through experimental soil bioretention columns containing 60% sand : 40% compost. Juvenile coho salmon, zebrafish embryos, and the waterflea Ceriodaphnia dubia were exposed to untreated runoff or bioretention treated runoff and monitored for acute lethality and sublethal effects. Both the concentration of PAHs and toxicity to aquatic test animals decreased rapidly as a function of time since sealcoat application. For all exposure trials, bioretention treatment successfully reduced or eliminated lethal and sublethal effects of the PAH-rich sealcoat runoff.