Abstract Title

Session S-09D: Salmon Recovery: Implementation and Progress II

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Location

Room 611-612

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

The Puget Sound Partnership is working with a team of consultants led by Long Live the Kings to develop a performance management system for recovery of Chinook salmon across Puget Sound. With final products due in May 2014, this presentation will discuss the mechanics for implementing the project in sixteen unique watersheds, successes and challenges, and lessons learned for future application and planning. In 1999, Puget Sound Chinook salmon were listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. NOAA-NMFS (the federal agency accountable for the listing) supported authorship of unique watershed chapters by locally-led, collaborative watershed groups comprised of local jurisdictions, tribes, non-profits, state and federal entities and other stakeholders. NOAA completed review in 2007 and adopted the chapters with a supplement acknowledging a missing piece essential to the plan: a regional monitoring and adaptive management framework that would track the adequacy of proposed actions and allow watersheds and the region to review, revise and strengthen their chapters over time. PSP and the LLTK team of consultants are working with 16 local watershed teams of scientists, managers and policy makers to apply the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation approach for translating existing Chinook recovery chapters into a common regional language. Over a year long period, watersheds are identifying components, attributes and indicators for the ecosystem that can be used to characterize the health of Chinook and their habitat, conducting a viability analysis to identify current and future desired status, identifying pressures, and documenting “theories of change” and hypotheses for recovery. Authors will discuss the mechanics of this project and how the outcomes are intended to form the basis of a monitoring and adaptive management system for Chinook salmon recovery in Puget Sound.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

How Are the Fish Doing? Development and implementation of sixteen watershed monitoring and adaptive management programs for recovery of Puget Sound Chinook

Room 611-612

The Puget Sound Partnership is working with a team of consultants led by Long Live the Kings to develop a performance management system for recovery of Chinook salmon across Puget Sound. With final products due in May 2014, this presentation will discuss the mechanics for implementing the project in sixteen unique watersheds, successes and challenges, and lessons learned for future application and planning. In 1999, Puget Sound Chinook salmon were listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. NOAA-NMFS (the federal agency accountable for the listing) supported authorship of unique watershed chapters by locally-led, collaborative watershed groups comprised of local jurisdictions, tribes, non-profits, state and federal entities and other stakeholders. NOAA completed review in 2007 and adopted the chapters with a supplement acknowledging a missing piece essential to the plan: a regional monitoring and adaptive management framework that would track the adequacy of proposed actions and allow watersheds and the region to review, revise and strengthen their chapters over time. PSP and the LLTK team of consultants are working with 16 local watershed teams of scientists, managers and policy makers to apply the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation approach for translating existing Chinook recovery chapters into a common regional language. Over a year long period, watersheds are identifying components, attributes and indicators for the ecosystem that can be used to characterize the health of Chinook and their habitat, conducting a viability analysis to identify current and future desired status, identifying pressures, and documenting “theories of change” and hypotheses for recovery. Authors will discuss the mechanics of this project and how the outcomes are intended to form the basis of a monitoring and adaptive management system for Chinook salmon recovery in Puget Sound.