Abstract Title

Session S-09E: Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Species: Threats and Conservation

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Sea star mortality in several genera including Pycnopodia and Pisaster was unusually high along the west coast of the United States, September-current (December) 2013. Captive and free-ranging animals were analyzed for signs of disease using a variety of diagnostics including cytology, microbiology, histopathology, and transmission electron microscopy. Mortality in regions of the Seattle waterfront and in the captive collection of Pycnopodia maintained at the Seattle Aquarium (n=48) was 100%. Disease was initially observed only in Pycnopodia species (specifically the Sunflower sea star) and over the period of ~ 1 month included a variety of other sea stars including Pisaster and Evasterias. Mortality rates in affected regions of the Salish sea continues to be high (December, 2013). Multiple organizations and collaborators (Cornell University, Wildlife Conservation Society, SeaDoc Society, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Vancouver Aquarium, USGS National Wildlife Health Center, and NW ZooPath) are participating in the ongoing efforts to determine the cause of this unusual mortality event in sea stars. The results to-date of the disease investigation by the Seattle Aquarium and others will be presented.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Captive and free-ranging sea star disease findings from the Seattle, Washington, waterfront during the 2013 sea star ‘wasting disease’ unusual mortality event

Room 613-614

Sea star mortality in several genera including Pycnopodia and Pisaster was unusually high along the west coast of the United States, September-current (December) 2013. Captive and free-ranging animals were analyzed for signs of disease using a variety of diagnostics including cytology, microbiology, histopathology, and transmission electron microscopy. Mortality in regions of the Seattle waterfront and in the captive collection of Pycnopodia maintained at the Seattle Aquarium (n=48) was 100%. Disease was initially observed only in Pycnopodia species (specifically the Sunflower sea star) and over the period of ~ 1 month included a variety of other sea stars including Pisaster and Evasterias. Mortality rates in affected regions of the Salish sea continues to be high (December, 2013). Multiple organizations and collaborators (Cornell University, Wildlife Conservation Society, SeaDoc Society, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Vancouver Aquarium, USGS National Wildlife Health Center, and NW ZooPath) are participating in the ongoing efforts to determine the cause of this unusual mortality event in sea stars. The results to-date of the disease investigation by the Seattle Aquarium and others will be presented.