Abstract Title

Session S-09F: Emerging Tools for Synthesizing and Communicating Ecosystem Information II

Proposed Abstract Title

Signal to noise: Key needs and strategies for communicating ecosystem science

Keywords

Planning Assessment & Communication

Location

Room 602-603

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

The special session "Emerging tools for synthesizing and communicating ecosystem information" includes a 30-minute panel discussion divided into two 15-minute blocks within the allotted session time. Panelists include Joel Baker, UW Puget Sound Institute; Rob Fatland, Microsoft Research; Amy Merten, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration; Ian Perry, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; and Charles Simenstad, UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Science. The panel will discuss strategies for improving information flow among scientists, stakeholders and policymakers within the Salish Sea region. Questions will touch on key information needs and gaps, the potential value or hindrance of new technologies in addressing these needs, and how emerging media is changing the way scientists conduct, define and convey ecosystem synthesis.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Signal to noise: Key needs and strategies for communicating ecosystem science

Room 602-603

The special session "Emerging tools for synthesizing and communicating ecosystem information" includes a 30-minute panel discussion divided into two 15-minute blocks within the allotted session time. Panelists include Joel Baker, UW Puget Sound Institute; Rob Fatland, Microsoft Research; Amy Merten, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration; Ian Perry, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; and Charles Simenstad, UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Science. The panel will discuss strategies for improving information flow among scientists, stakeholders and policymakers within the Salish Sea region. Questions will touch on key information needs and gaps, the potential value or hindrance of new technologies in addressing these needs, and how emerging media is changing the way scientists conduct, define and convey ecosystem synthesis.