Abstract Title

Session S-09G: Building Community Resilience: Moving Beyond Climate Adaptation Planning to Implementation

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Adaptation to climate change is a common concern on policy and management agendas of many federal, state, local and tribal governments; planning for a climate-altered future is becoming more widespread and some adaptive actions are being taken. In each of the three West Coast states ‒ Washington, Oregon and California ‒ state agencies, governors, and some local and tribal entities have acknowledged the need for adaptation and begun to develop relevant scientific assessments and policy and strategy documents to prepare for and manage the impacts of climate change. This has led many decision-makers, program managers, funders, and other stakeholders to ask what adaptation success would look like and how one would evaluate adaptation effectiveness over time. The academic community is increasingly asking similar questions and publishing on this topic in peer-reviewed journals and books. This paper reports on a 2-year, transdisciplinary project engaging academic experts from a range of relevant disciplines as well as practitioner experts from each of the West Coast states (focusing particularly on findings from Washington) to develop some practice-relevant answers on what processes, accomplishments and outcomes count as success, how to set governance processes up for ongoing adaptive processes of learning and adjusting, and how to measure progress in a desirable direction when environmental conditions and concurrent pressures are uncertain and pose unpleasant, if not unprecedented challenges to coastal communities.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Successful Adaptation to Climate Change in the Coastal Context: Insights from Scientists and Practitioners

Room 6E

Adaptation to climate change is a common concern on policy and management agendas of many federal, state, local and tribal governments; planning for a climate-altered future is becoming more widespread and some adaptive actions are being taken. In each of the three West Coast states ‒ Washington, Oregon and California ‒ state agencies, governors, and some local and tribal entities have acknowledged the need for adaptation and begun to develop relevant scientific assessments and policy and strategy documents to prepare for and manage the impacts of climate change. This has led many decision-makers, program managers, funders, and other stakeholders to ask what adaptation success would look like and how one would evaluate adaptation effectiveness over time. The academic community is increasingly asking similar questions and publishing on this topic in peer-reviewed journals and books. This paper reports on a 2-year, transdisciplinary project engaging academic experts from a range of relevant disciplines as well as practitioner experts from each of the West Coast states (focusing particularly on findings from Washington) to develop some practice-relevant answers on what processes, accomplishments and outcomes count as success, how to set governance processes up for ongoing adaptive processes of learning and adjusting, and how to measure progress in a desirable direction when environmental conditions and concurrent pressures are uncertain and pose unpleasant, if not unprecedented challenges to coastal communities.