Abstract Title

Session S-09H: Trading Cultural Ecosystem Services from Data Collection to Decision Making

Presenter/Author Information

Jennifer Spencer
Andrew DayFollow

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 607

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

West Coast Aquatic and Planning RoleWest Coast Aquatic (WCA) is a forum for governments, communities, and businesses to work together on the health and wealth of the West Coast of Vancouver Island (WCVI) marine area. Most recently, WCA recently produced and approved a Coastal Strategy for the West Coast, which outlines principles, values, goals and objectives for the region. The Coastal Strategy also includes priority action areas, one of which is marine spatial planning in Barkley and Clayoqout Sounds.The WCA approach to marine spatial planning includes the development of an adaptive planning tool, which provides a Sound-wide spatial depiction of the different values in the area so that businesses, planners and managers can make better informed decisions as development opportunity grows and environment changes. Included in this tool are maps with designations that show current values and circumstances in each planning unit. The value of this approach provides more detailed guidance to new applicants and planners about areas that may or may not be suitable for development without undermining ecological, cultural and other values, thus decreasing the risks and realities of future negative impacts and conflicts. West Coast Aquatic Planning Approach and Inclusion of Cultural Ecosystem ServicesThe West Coast Aquatic planning approach is highly participatory, with partnerships and engagement at the community level and also with multiple government agencies, institutions, and sector associations. A participatory approach is reflected in the planning process through the collection and use of local, sectoral, managerial, and expert knowledge, data, values, and goals to inform plan development. With its partners, WCA discusses current and future uses that respect the area and its important cultural, social, economic, and ecological features and values. Non-material values linked to ecosystems, including sense of place, aesthetic values, cultural heritage and others, strongly contribute to well-being for those living and visiting Barkley and Clayoqout Sounds.Data collection was an important initial stage in WCA’s planning. Our data sources range from publically available data, data from researchers obtained though sharing and protocol agreements and data collected through local knowledge mapping interviews with user groups and First Nations. Protocol agreements have been put in place to govern the use and ownership of information collected and shared during the planning process, while providing WCA staff the opportunity to integrate culturally sensitive information into draft planning tools. The approach has provided an understanding of community visions and values for locations throughout the planning area, and the ability to map and characterize many of those values, including cultural ecosystem services. The result has allowed WCA to establish a new integrated decision-making approach to an area which previously lacked coordination and knowledge between sectors, jurisdictions and community. An adaptive planning approach will now allow the region to consider a wide spectrum of values when making integrated decisions about appropriate future locations for development and protection.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

West Coast Aquatic Marine Planning Approach: Integrating Cultural Ecosystem Services

Room 607

West Coast Aquatic and Planning RoleWest Coast Aquatic (WCA) is a forum for governments, communities, and businesses to work together on the health and wealth of the West Coast of Vancouver Island (WCVI) marine area. Most recently, WCA recently produced and approved a Coastal Strategy for the West Coast, which outlines principles, values, goals and objectives for the region. The Coastal Strategy also includes priority action areas, one of which is marine spatial planning in Barkley and Clayoqout Sounds.The WCA approach to marine spatial planning includes the development of an adaptive planning tool, which provides a Sound-wide spatial depiction of the different values in the area so that businesses, planners and managers can make better informed decisions as development opportunity grows and environment changes. Included in this tool are maps with designations that show current values and circumstances in each planning unit. The value of this approach provides more detailed guidance to new applicants and planners about areas that may or may not be suitable for development without undermining ecological, cultural and other values, thus decreasing the risks and realities of future negative impacts and conflicts. West Coast Aquatic Planning Approach and Inclusion of Cultural Ecosystem ServicesThe West Coast Aquatic planning approach is highly participatory, with partnerships and engagement at the community level and also with multiple government agencies, institutions, and sector associations. A participatory approach is reflected in the planning process through the collection and use of local, sectoral, managerial, and expert knowledge, data, values, and goals to inform plan development. With its partners, WCA discusses current and future uses that respect the area and its important cultural, social, economic, and ecological features and values. Non-material values linked to ecosystems, including sense of place, aesthetic values, cultural heritage and others, strongly contribute to well-being for those living and visiting Barkley and Clayoqout Sounds.Data collection was an important initial stage in WCA’s planning. Our data sources range from publically available data, data from researchers obtained though sharing and protocol agreements and data collected through local knowledge mapping interviews with user groups and First Nations. Protocol agreements have been put in place to govern the use and ownership of information collected and shared during the planning process, while providing WCA staff the opportunity to integrate culturally sensitive information into draft planning tools. The approach has provided an understanding of community visions and values for locations throughout the planning area, and the ability to map and characterize many of those values, including cultural ecosystem services. The result has allowed WCA to establish a new integrated decision-making approach to an area which previously lacked coordination and knowledge between sectors, jurisdictions and community. An adaptive planning approach will now allow the region to consider a wide spectrum of values when making integrated decisions about appropriate future locations for development and protection.