Abstract Title

Session S-09H: Trading Cultural Ecosystem Services from Data Collection to Decision Making

Presenter/Author Information

Bessie Schwarz, Yale UniversityFollow

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

As social scientists develop promising new ways to measure Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) for decision-making, the question becomes if and how political decision-makers integrate this information into natural resources policy and management. My talk will dissect participatory value mapping as a method for bringing CES into the legislative processes. Value mapping uses spatially explicit surveys to reveal the density and distribution of values (both monetary and non-monetary) that stakeholders attribute to their environment. In a study conducted in 2013, I explored the use of this method to inform Shoreline Master Programs on the Olympic Peninsula. I used Conceptual Content Cognitive Mapping and Q-Methodology to test the effect of a set of Forest Service value maps on the decision-making processes of the region’s mayors, county commissioners, and state-appointed politicians. Understanding the power of participatory mapping for political decision-making sheds light on the potential for CES to integrate socio-cultural dimensions of ecosystems into mainstream environmental management.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Operationalizing Cultural Ecosystem Services for Political Decision-Making

Room 607

As social scientists develop promising new ways to measure Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) for decision-making, the question becomes if and how political decision-makers integrate this information into natural resources policy and management. My talk will dissect participatory value mapping as a method for bringing CES into the legislative processes. Value mapping uses spatially explicit surveys to reveal the density and distribution of values (both monetary and non-monetary) that stakeholders attribute to their environment. In a study conducted in 2013, I explored the use of this method to inform Shoreline Master Programs on the Olympic Peninsula. I used Conceptual Content Cognitive Mapping and Q-Methodology to test the effect of a set of Forest Service value maps on the decision-making processes of the region’s mayors, county commissioners, and state-appointed politicians. Understanding the power of participatory mapping for political decision-making sheds light on the potential for CES to integrate socio-cultural dimensions of ecosystems into mainstream environmental management.