Abstract Title

Session S-09H: Trading Cultural Ecosystem Services from Data Collection to Decision Making

Proposed Abstract Title

Understanding Cultural Ecosystem Services related to Salmon in the Quinault Indian Nation

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 607

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

The consideration of cultural ecosystem services is of growing interest to natural resource managers. Tools need to be developed and shared for identifying, measuring, and presenting the status of cultural services so that they can be monitored or their impacts considered when assessing potential management strategies. This presentation discusses the process for identifying, measuring, and presenting cultural indicators relevant to salmon in the Quinault Indian Nation. We first interviewed and coded the responses from 18 tribal adults and two high school classrooms to identify the diverse services associated with salmon. We then developed preliminary questions to test ways of measuring the status of those services. Twenty-four people responded to these questions in one of three formats: community workshop, online survey, or household survey. We present the services coded from the interviews and the current status of those services. We then discuss how such data can be used to monitor cultural services as well as consider different salmon habitat restoration scenarios based on their potential impacts to cultural services.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Understanding Cultural Ecosystem Services related to Salmon in the Quinault Indian Nation

Room 607

The consideration of cultural ecosystem services is of growing interest to natural resource managers. Tools need to be developed and shared for identifying, measuring, and presenting the status of cultural services so that they can be monitored or their impacts considered when assessing potential management strategies. This presentation discusses the process for identifying, measuring, and presenting cultural indicators relevant to salmon in the Quinault Indian Nation. We first interviewed and coded the responses from 18 tribal adults and two high school classrooms to identify the diverse services associated with salmon. We then developed preliminary questions to test ways of measuring the status of those services. Twenty-four people responded to these questions in one of three formats: community workshop, online survey, or household survey. We present the services coded from the interviews and the current status of those services. We then discuss how such data can be used to monitor cultural services as well as consider different salmon habitat restoration scenarios based on their potential impacts to cultural services.