Abstract Title

Session S-10A: Shellfish Aquaculture: Exploring Themes of Sustainability and Ecosystem Recovery

Keywords

Harmful Algal Blooms and Shellfish

Start Date

2-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

This project explored the application of extractive aquaculture technologies using shellfish for nutrient mitigation in urban nearshore environments of Tacoma and Olympia, WA. Nutrient removal by shellfish, which are then harvested and removed from the system, has the potential to help address environmental issues such as excess inputs of nutrients (eutrophication), low dissolved oxygen, and reduced light availability. The research focus was to: 1) implement demonstration aquaculture systems; 2) determine nutrient removal services of mussels grown; 3) assess the feasibility of producing soil compost from the demonstration systems; and 4) increase local stakeholder awareness of and engagement in urban water quality mitigation needs and strategies. In Budd Inlet over 225 nylon straps were placed under 3 existing dock structures to provide a suitable substrate for mussel recruits. By summer’s end, over 3,600 kg (over 8,000 lbs) of adult mussels were filter-feeding on these straps. These mussels were harvested, chipped, and delivered to The Evergreen State College’s Organic Farm, WSU-Puyallup Research and Extension Center, and Cedar Creek Correctional Center for ongoing compost trials. The mussels removed an estimated 360 kg (800 lbs) of nitrogen (wet weight) from lower Budd Inlet over the course of 4 months. In addition, to the bioextraction trials, outreach efforts focused on improving public understanding of local water quality issues, ecosystem services of shellfish, and controlling upland sources of nutrients that flow into Puget Sound.

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May 2nd, 1:30 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Shellfish at Work: Nutrient Bioextraction Demonstration in South Puget Sound

Room 615-616-617

This project explored the application of extractive aquaculture technologies using shellfish for nutrient mitigation in urban nearshore environments of Tacoma and Olympia, WA. Nutrient removal by shellfish, which are then harvested and removed from the system, has the potential to help address environmental issues such as excess inputs of nutrients (eutrophication), low dissolved oxygen, and reduced light availability. The research focus was to: 1) implement demonstration aquaculture systems; 2) determine nutrient removal services of mussels grown; 3) assess the feasibility of producing soil compost from the demonstration systems; and 4) increase local stakeholder awareness of and engagement in urban water quality mitigation needs and strategies. In Budd Inlet over 225 nylon straps were placed under 3 existing dock structures to provide a suitable substrate for mussel recruits. By summer’s end, over 3,600 kg (over 8,000 lbs) of adult mussels were filter-feeding on these straps. These mussels were harvested, chipped, and delivered to The Evergreen State College’s Organic Farm, WSU-Puyallup Research and Extension Center, and Cedar Creek Correctional Center for ongoing compost trials. The mussels removed an estimated 360 kg (800 lbs) of nitrogen (wet weight) from lower Budd Inlet over the course of 4 months. In addition, to the bioextraction trials, outreach efforts focused on improving public understanding of local water quality issues, ecosystem services of shellfish, and controlling upland sources of nutrients that flow into Puget Sound.