Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Changes in Ecosystem Function and Climate Revealed by Long-term Monitoring in the Salish Sea

Description

Long-term biological datasets can provide valuable insight to managers of commercially and recreationally-important species. While bivalve populations have been well-studied in select ecosystems, native veneroid clam population variability has not been extensively researched in the northeast Pacific Ocean despite the biological and social value of these species. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has been collecting intertidal clam length and weight data following similar methods since the 1970s in order to manage, and now co-manage with tribes, clam harvesting activities. We used these data in a dynamic factor analysis to quantify decadal trends in population variability among three clam species in four sub-basins within the southern Salish Sea. Over the last 38 years, Leukoma staminea populations have generally declined while Saxidomus gigantea and Clinocardium nuttallii populations have either increased or decreased depending on the sub-basin. Future analysis will expand our investigation to include more clam populations and sub-basins as well as to determine what explanatory variables may be driving population trends.

Comments

This talk might fit best under the general species and food webs session, but because it is an analysis looking at almost 40 years of intertidal clam population variability, the moderators of the other two suggested sessions may be interested in these results. The ultimate goal is to combine this analysis with environmental variables, but I'm not sure that will be done by the time I give the talk. If not, the talk just focuses on how the clam populations have changed temporally. I'm happy to present in any of the sessions and I hope the moderators can determine if this research is a good fit for their session.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Native clam population variability in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

Long-term biological datasets can provide valuable insight to managers of commercially and recreationally-important species. While bivalve populations have been well-studied in select ecosystems, native veneroid clam population variability has not been extensively researched in the northeast Pacific Ocean despite the biological and social value of these species. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has been collecting intertidal clam length and weight data following similar methods since the 1970s in order to manage, and now co-manage with tribes, clam harvesting activities. We used these data in a dynamic factor analysis to quantify decadal trends in population variability among three clam species in four sub-basins within the southern Salish Sea. Over the last 38 years, Leukoma staminea populations have generally declined while Saxidomus gigantea and Clinocardium nuttallii populations have either increased or decreased depending on the sub-basin. Future analysis will expand our investigation to include more clam populations and sub-basins as well as to determine what explanatory variables may be driving population trends.