Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens in a changing world

Description

In Puget Sound, increasing occurrences of harmful algal blooms (HABs, caused by marine dinoflagellates in the genus Alexandrium) severely threaten human health and shellfish industry. This trend could continue in the next several decades with projected future changes in global and regional climate in the Puget Sound region. As part of a two-year study funded by NOAA’s Coastal and Ocean Climate Application Program aimed at developing a decision support tool to assist Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) with HABs monitoring resource allocation, this presentation is focused on the development of a high-resolution hydrodynamic and transport model of Puget Sound that provides information on physical variables (e.g., temperature, salinity, and residence time) contributing to Alexandrium blooms. The model is built upon Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) existing Puget Sound hydrodynamic model with substantial refinement in intertidal zones and improvement with water temperature simulation. The hydrodynamic model is driven by hydro-climate forcing data produced by the University of Washington Climate Impact Group. Model inputs include regional climate model simulations, implemented at 12 km resolution over the Northwest U.S., and a consistent set of hydrologic simulations that provide freshwater inputs to Puget Sound. The hydrodynamic model simulates detailed hydrodynamic properties of Puget Sound under both historical and future climate change conditions. The model results can then be correlated with observed shellfish toxicity data to develop a decision support tool to assistant WDOH in allocating HABs monitoring resources in Puget Sound under a changing climate.

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A High-resolution Hydrodynamic Model to Support Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring in Puget Sound

2016SSEC

In Puget Sound, increasing occurrences of harmful algal blooms (HABs, caused by marine dinoflagellates in the genus Alexandrium) severely threaten human health and shellfish industry. This trend could continue in the next several decades with projected future changes in global and regional climate in the Puget Sound region. As part of a two-year study funded by NOAA’s Coastal and Ocean Climate Application Program aimed at developing a decision support tool to assist Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) with HABs monitoring resource allocation, this presentation is focused on the development of a high-resolution hydrodynamic and transport model of Puget Sound that provides information on physical variables (e.g., temperature, salinity, and residence time) contributing to Alexandrium blooms. The model is built upon Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) existing Puget Sound hydrodynamic model with substantial refinement in intertidal zones and improvement with water temperature simulation. The hydrodynamic model is driven by hydro-climate forcing data produced by the University of Washington Climate Impact Group. Model inputs include regional climate model simulations, implemented at 12 km resolution over the Northwest U.S., and a consistent set of hydrologic simulations that provide freshwater inputs to Puget Sound. The hydrodynamic model simulates detailed hydrodynamic properties of Puget Sound under both historical and future climate change conditions. The model results can then be correlated with observed shellfish toxicity data to develop a decision support tool to assistant WDOH in allocating HABs monitoring resources in Puget Sound under a changing climate.