Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens in a changing world

Description

The first confirmed DSP human illnesses in the United States occurred in 2011 due to the consumption of mussels from Sequim Bay State Park on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The emergence of this new threat to public health had an immediate impact on the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, whose shellfish beds were located nearby. In the four years since, the Tribe has collaborated with NOAA, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the volunteer-based SoundToxins partnership to help develop a management strategy for DSP. DSP has proved to be a persistent problem in Sequim Bay with shellfish above the regulatory limit for DSP toxins every year since the initial human cases. In addition, the causative organisms, dinoflagellates of the genus Dinophysis, are also quite common in the spring, summer and fall in Sequim Bay. This collaboration has, in the last few years been able to determine that DTX-1 is the most common DSP toxin in Puget Sound shellfish, the relative uptake rates of DSP toxins in several species of shellfish and how best to utilize SoundToxin’s observations of Dinophysis in the water column to prioritize shellfish samples for DSP testing at the WDOH laboratory. These partners have now turned their focus to the potentially toxic dinoflagellates in the genus Azadinium. Azadinium has been known produce azaspiracids in other parts of the world, toxins that can a cause a syndrome in humans called Azaspiracid Shellfish Poisoning (AZP) with symptoms similar to DSP. In a pilot study three species of these small dinoflagellates were found in Puget Sound using the molecular technique of qPCR (A. spinosum, A. obesum, and A. poporum). A new multi-year study will determine the distribution of Azadinium species in Puget Sound and whether they are producing azaspiracids.

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A collaborative response to emerging threats to human health in the Salish Sea: Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) and Azaspiracid Shellfish Poisoning (AZP)

2016SSEC

The first confirmed DSP human illnesses in the United States occurred in 2011 due to the consumption of mussels from Sequim Bay State Park on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The emergence of this new threat to public health had an immediate impact on the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, whose shellfish beds were located nearby. In the four years since, the Tribe has collaborated with NOAA, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the volunteer-based SoundToxins partnership to help develop a management strategy for DSP. DSP has proved to be a persistent problem in Sequim Bay with shellfish above the regulatory limit for DSP toxins every year since the initial human cases. In addition, the causative organisms, dinoflagellates of the genus Dinophysis, are also quite common in the spring, summer and fall in Sequim Bay. This collaboration has, in the last few years been able to determine that DTX-1 is the most common DSP toxin in Puget Sound shellfish, the relative uptake rates of DSP toxins in several species of shellfish and how best to utilize SoundToxin’s observations of Dinophysis in the water column to prioritize shellfish samples for DSP testing at the WDOH laboratory. These partners have now turned their focus to the potentially toxic dinoflagellates in the genus Azadinium. Azadinium has been known produce azaspiracids in other parts of the world, toxins that can a cause a syndrome in humans called Azaspiracid Shellfish Poisoning (AZP) with symptoms similar to DSP. In a pilot study three species of these small dinoflagellates were found in Puget Sound using the molecular technique of qPCR (A. spinosum, A. obesum, and A. poporum). A new multi-year study will determine the distribution of Azadinium species in Puget Sound and whether they are producing azaspiracids.