Proposed Abstract Title

The Effect of Temperature on Depuration of the Pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum in the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica)

Presenter/Author Information

Ziwen Ye, University of MaineFollow

Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens in a changing world

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Shellfish serve as first line sentinels to measure challenges to ecosystem health, including marine toxins, viruses and pathogenic bacteria. Many vibrios occur naturally in coastal estuaries at generally low abundances, but pathogenic vibrio species can become human health issues when they proliferate during warm periods. Depuration of these pathogens from bivalves, either by flushing of the digestive organs or pseudofeces voidance from the mantle, varies as a function of bivalve pumping rates and bacterial growth rates. Although this process is reasonably well understood for warmer water conditions, such as the Gulf of Mexico, there is far less information about pathogenic bacteria depuration rates under higher latitude, cold water conditions. Projecting how climate change at higher latitudes may affect oyster and other bivalve aquaculture requires knowledge of how increasing temperature influences the depuration rates of these species. We show that depuration times of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica increase sharply as a function of temperature between 15-25°C, a difference attributable mainly to temperature effects on bacterial growth rates. In natural systems, the increase in stratification from climate-driven temperature increases also affect the character and abundance of phytoplankton and detritus; factors that could lead to increased gut residence times and thus even longer depuration times. Our data provide a starting point for modeling these and other climate change effects on oyster depuration efficiencies, and suggest that longer windows of warm periods in future will require alternate strategies for management of aquaculture farms, particularly in the sheltered waters of the Salish Sea.

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The Effect of Temperature on Depuration of the Pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum in the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica)

2016SSEC

Shellfish serve as first line sentinels to measure challenges to ecosystem health, including marine toxins, viruses and pathogenic bacteria. Many vibrios occur naturally in coastal estuaries at generally low abundances, but pathogenic vibrio species can become human health issues when they proliferate during warm periods. Depuration of these pathogens from bivalves, either by flushing of the digestive organs or pseudofeces voidance from the mantle, varies as a function of bivalve pumping rates and bacterial growth rates. Although this process is reasonably well understood for warmer water conditions, such as the Gulf of Mexico, there is far less information about pathogenic bacteria depuration rates under higher latitude, cold water conditions. Projecting how climate change at higher latitudes may affect oyster and other bivalve aquaculture requires knowledge of how increasing temperature influences the depuration rates of these species. We show that depuration times of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica increase sharply as a function of temperature between 15-25°C, a difference attributable mainly to temperature effects on bacterial growth rates. In natural systems, the increase in stratification from climate-driven temperature increases also affect the character and abundance of phytoplankton and detritus; factors that could lead to increased gut residence times and thus even longer depuration times. Our data provide a starting point for modeling these and other climate change effects on oyster depuration efficiencies, and suggest that longer windows of warm periods in future will require alternate strategies for management of aquaculture farms, particularly in the sheltered waters of the Salish Sea.