Presenter/Author Information

Tiffany J. Odell, Pierce CountyFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Moving beyond education and outreach to behavior change

Description

The Don’t Drip and Drive program addresses an important source of pollution in the Puget Sound region – vehicles that leak fluids and cause significant water quality impairments. From 2013-2015 the Stormwater Outreach for Regional Municipalities (STORM) network and partners developed and implemented a behavior change program to improve vehicle owners awareness of leaks and motivate them to fix their leaks. Two campaign phases were run in 2013 and 2014, with the second phase building on lessons learned during the pilot. The following key components have been incorporated into the program:

  • Campaign Promotion: Online, radio and social media advertising across the region and localized advertising promoted by campaign partners promote campaign messages and direct our target audience to a resource website.

  • Events: Leak check events to identify leaking vehicles, promote repairing leaks and testing different intervention strategies for effectiveness.

  • Partnering with repair shops: Free leak inspections and discounted repairs are provided by partnering repair shops.

  • Workshops: Free auto leaks inspection workshops at technical training centers taught by mechanic instructors that provide information about vehicle maintenance, with a focus on leak repair.

Campaign goals are to build vehicle owners’ awareness of their vehicle leak and increase their likelihood of repairing it within three months. The program’s long-term goal is to change social norms so that people value finding and fixing vehicle leaks.

The campaign adopted a social marketing approach to design a program that makes it easier for vehicle owners to fix leaks. This includes minimizing barriers that impeded their ability to repair their vehicle and using motivating messages that emphasize the benefits of making repairs that resonate with vehicle owners. In the first two phases of the campaign, goals were reached and often exceeded. More than 8,000 vehicles received free inspections and an estimated 1,669 vehicles were repaired.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Changing behaviors to reduce the impact of vehicle leaks

2016SSEC

The Don’t Drip and Drive program addresses an important source of pollution in the Puget Sound region – vehicles that leak fluids and cause significant water quality impairments. From 2013-2015 the Stormwater Outreach for Regional Municipalities (STORM) network and partners developed and implemented a behavior change program to improve vehicle owners awareness of leaks and motivate them to fix their leaks. Two campaign phases were run in 2013 and 2014, with the second phase building on lessons learned during the pilot. The following key components have been incorporated into the program:

  • Campaign Promotion: Online, radio and social media advertising across the region and localized advertising promoted by campaign partners promote campaign messages and direct our target audience to a resource website.

  • Events: Leak check events to identify leaking vehicles, promote repairing leaks and testing different intervention strategies for effectiveness.

  • Partnering with repair shops: Free leak inspections and discounted repairs are provided by partnering repair shops.

  • Workshops: Free auto leaks inspection workshops at technical training centers taught by mechanic instructors that provide information about vehicle maintenance, with a focus on leak repair.

Campaign goals are to build vehicle owners’ awareness of their vehicle leak and increase their likelihood of repairing it within three months. The program’s long-term goal is to change social norms so that people value finding and fixing vehicle leaks.

The campaign adopted a social marketing approach to design a program that makes it easier for vehicle owners to fix leaks. This includes minimizing barriers that impeded their ability to repair their vehicle and using motivating messages that emphasize the benefits of making repairs that resonate with vehicle owners. In the first two phases of the campaign, goals were reached and often exceeded. More than 8,000 vehicles received free inspections and an estimated 1,669 vehicles were repaired.