Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

Moving beyond education and outreach to behavior change

Description

Polluted stormwater is the greatest single threat to the Salish Sea and other waterways. The challenge of shifting to green stormwater infrastructure can seem overwhelming. Retrofitting existing developments will require many thousands of actions at the site scale to bring about measurable improvements to watersheds. Can volunteer-based capacity-building programs provide a cost-effective means to achieve the level of retrofits necessary to make a measurable difference?

This poster will highlight programs implemented by Washington State University Extension's Water Resources Program whose goals are to achieve substantial on-the-ground results through highly trained volunteers offering green infrastructure/low-impact development (LID) education and site-based technical assistance to landowners. Examples of recommendations include guidance for carrying out GSI projects such as rain gardens, pervious pavements, green-stormwater landscaping techniques, large-scale rainwater catchment, and vegetated roofs. The poster will highlight: (1) Program models/framework, including integration of hands-on learning by installing GSI projects. (2) The successes, drawbacks, and challenges of various programs from both the stormwater-manager perspective and the volunteers' perspective. (3) Results of various assessments, such as those that evaluate: actual on-the-ground impacts; staffing and public investments required; potential for scaled-up implementation; program implementation hurdles; and barriers to landowners following through. (4) Less tangible benefits of community-based programs that rely on dedicated, trained volunteers.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Can Volunteer-Based Programs Be Effective in the Green Stormwater Revolution?

2016SSEC

Polluted stormwater is the greatest single threat to the Salish Sea and other waterways. The challenge of shifting to green stormwater infrastructure can seem overwhelming. Retrofitting existing developments will require many thousands of actions at the site scale to bring about measurable improvements to watersheds. Can volunteer-based capacity-building programs provide a cost-effective means to achieve the level of retrofits necessary to make a measurable difference?

This poster will highlight programs implemented by Washington State University Extension's Water Resources Program whose goals are to achieve substantial on-the-ground results through highly trained volunteers offering green infrastructure/low-impact development (LID) education and site-based technical assistance to landowners. Examples of recommendations include guidance for carrying out GSI projects such as rain gardens, pervious pavements, green-stormwater landscaping techniques, large-scale rainwater catchment, and vegetated roofs. The poster will highlight: (1) Program models/framework, including integration of hands-on learning by installing GSI projects. (2) The successes, drawbacks, and challenges of various programs from both the stormwater-manager perspective and the volunteers' perspective. (3) Results of various assessments, such as those that evaluate: actual on-the-ground impacts; staffing and public investments required; potential for scaled-up implementation; program implementation hurdles; and barriers to landowners following through. (4) Less tangible benefits of community-based programs that rely on dedicated, trained volunteers.