Presenter/Author Information

Emma S. Norman, Northwest Indian CollegeFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Salish Sea Studies: An integrating context for teaching, research, and community engagement

Description

As part of this panel, I will discuss the development of the first Bachelor program at Northwest Indian College - the Bachelor of Science in Native Environmental Science (BSNES). I will present how the connection to, and relationship with place is central to this degree program – both in terms of pedagogy and program outcomes. In this session, I will explore how place-based pedagogy, culturally-infused curriculum, and inter-generational education ground and inform the NES degree program. This approach is consistent with Indigenous education, wherein connection to place and knowledge of the environment has been, and continues to be, critical in supporting and maintaining resilient and thriving communities. Native environmental scientists build upon their connection to place by being innovative and using Indigenous knowledge and technologies to promote sovereignty and self -determination. Other pillars of the BSNES program build on this connection, particularly: relationality -- an awareness of self and knowledge of relations’ ancestry; inquiry -- engaging in research and addressing questions that are relevant to Indigenous communities; and communication -- enacting the transfer of knowledge through diverse genres.

Comments

This is part of a panel discussion that is chaired by Steve Hollenhorst

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The Power of Place: The role of place-based pedagogy, culturally-infused curriculum and inter-generational education in Native Environmental Science

2016SSEC

As part of this panel, I will discuss the development of the first Bachelor program at Northwest Indian College - the Bachelor of Science in Native Environmental Science (BSNES). I will present how the connection to, and relationship with place is central to this degree program – both in terms of pedagogy and program outcomes. In this session, I will explore how place-based pedagogy, culturally-infused curriculum, and inter-generational education ground and inform the NES degree program. This approach is consistent with Indigenous education, wherein connection to place and knowledge of the environment has been, and continues to be, critical in supporting and maintaining resilient and thriving communities. Native environmental scientists build upon their connection to place by being innovative and using Indigenous knowledge and technologies to promote sovereignty and self -determination. Other pillars of the BSNES program build on this connection, particularly: relationality -- an awareness of self and knowledge of relations’ ancestry; inquiry -- engaging in research and addressing questions that are relevant to Indigenous communities; and communication -- enacting the transfer of knowledge through diverse genres.