Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

Shoreline Monitoring: Citizen Science, Restoration Effectiveness, and Data Integration

Description

The Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee (MRC)’s use of the Shoreline Montoring Toolbox illustrates how small local groups can use the Toolbox as a resource for building stronger connections between volunteers, managers and the science community while adapting to site-specific needs, local challenges and local volunteer resources.

The MRC is using trained citizen-science volunteers to monitor pre- and post-construction changes for a shoreline restoration project at Fort Townsend State Park. The MRC used the Shoreline Monitoring Toolbox Decision Tree and references to decide which beach characteristics should be measured for this particular project. They selected monitoring protocols consistent with regional monitoring datasets.

Protocols were then adapted and expanded to accommodate specific site conditions, project goals and volunteer resources. Changes to protocols were vetted with agency, tribal and science professionals. For example, WDFW forage fish spawning survey protocols were adjusted to complement current work by Tribal biologists, with approval from WDFW. Large woody debris monitoring followed protocols that were consistent with the Northwest Straits Foundation protocols for that data. Two of the project goals were improved access and increased understanding of the impacts of shoreline armoring, so new protocols were developed specifically for this site to measure visitor perceptions of public access improvements and effectiveness of interpretive signs with guidance from a WSU Extension Evaluation specialist. The MRC worked with science advisors from Washington SeaGrant, WSU Extension, Tribal biologists and state agencies (WDFW), in partnership with WA State Parks, the Northwest Straits Initiative and local volunteer groups to adapt protocols and recruit and train volunteers.

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Local Perspectives on the Shoreline Monitoring Toolbox

2016SSEC

The Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee (MRC)’s use of the Shoreline Montoring Toolbox illustrates how small local groups can use the Toolbox as a resource for building stronger connections between volunteers, managers and the science community while adapting to site-specific needs, local challenges and local volunteer resources.

The MRC is using trained citizen-science volunteers to monitor pre- and post-construction changes for a shoreline restoration project at Fort Townsend State Park. The MRC used the Shoreline Monitoring Toolbox Decision Tree and references to decide which beach characteristics should be measured for this particular project. They selected monitoring protocols consistent with regional monitoring datasets.

Protocols were then adapted and expanded to accommodate specific site conditions, project goals and volunteer resources. Changes to protocols were vetted with agency, tribal and science professionals. For example, WDFW forage fish spawning survey protocols were adjusted to complement current work by Tribal biologists, with approval from WDFW. Large woody debris monitoring followed protocols that were consistent with the Northwest Straits Foundation protocols for that data. Two of the project goals were improved access and increased understanding of the impacts of shoreline armoring, so new protocols were developed specifically for this site to measure visitor perceptions of public access improvements and effectiveness of interpretive signs with guidance from a WSU Extension Evaluation specialist. The MRC worked with science advisors from Washington SeaGrant, WSU Extension, Tribal biologists and state agencies (WDFW), in partnership with WA State Parks, the Northwest Straits Initiative and local volunteer groups to adapt protocols and recruit and train volunteers.