Proposed Abstract Title

Cleaning up the sea: the removal of a derelict fishing net is inspired by the Global Ghost Gear Initiative

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Plastic in the Salish Sea

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Abandoned, lost and derelict fishing gear (‘ghost gear’) is a major global problem, detrimentally impacting marine animals, ocean ecosystems and fisheries. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) estimates 640,000 tonnes of lost, discarded or abandoned fishing gear end up in our oceans every year, accounting for 10% of all marine debris.

In order to address the problem, World Animal Protection has founded the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), a cross-sectoral alliance to bring together members of the seafood industry, fishing associations, NGOs, governments and others, with the goal to reduce and remove ghost gear from our oceans. The GGGI is the first global initiative to address the ghost gear problem by building evidence, defining best practices and developing solutions.

One of the first ‘solution’ projects to be initiated by members of the GGGI is the removal of a derelict purse seine net near Pender Island, British Columbia. World Animal Protection Canada is partnering with Northwest Straights Marine Conservation Foundation (NWSF) in Washington to remove the net in spring 2015. The removal project will also involve other GGGI member groups including Steveston Harbour Authority (SHA), the first harbour in North America to collect old nets for recycling into fresh nylon which is then used in various consumer products such as carpet tile. NWSF’s expertise in derelict gear removal will also provide a training opportunity to one or two Canadian divers to learn about ghost gear retrieval work.

Finally, in addition to being a clean-up venture, the aim of this project is also ‘close the loop’, whereby the net will enter SHA’s recycling program and thus provides a great example of a cross-regional, collaborative effort.

Comments

Links to a pair of videos that showcase the work done for the recovery of a net near Pender Island, British Columbia can be found below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAfOoNfiqQk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG7J3sFt_g0

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Cleaning up the sea: the removal of a derelict fishing net is inspired by the Global Ghost Gear Initiative

2016SSEC

Abandoned, lost and derelict fishing gear (‘ghost gear’) is a major global problem, detrimentally impacting marine animals, ocean ecosystems and fisheries. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) estimates 640,000 tonnes of lost, discarded or abandoned fishing gear end up in our oceans every year, accounting for 10% of all marine debris.

In order to address the problem, World Animal Protection has founded the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), a cross-sectoral alliance to bring together members of the seafood industry, fishing associations, NGOs, governments and others, with the goal to reduce and remove ghost gear from our oceans. The GGGI is the first global initiative to address the ghost gear problem by building evidence, defining best practices and developing solutions.

One of the first ‘solution’ projects to be initiated by members of the GGGI is the removal of a derelict purse seine net near Pender Island, British Columbia. World Animal Protection Canada is partnering with Northwest Straights Marine Conservation Foundation (NWSF) in Washington to remove the net in spring 2015. The removal project will also involve other GGGI member groups including Steveston Harbour Authority (SHA), the first harbour in North America to collect old nets for recycling into fresh nylon which is then used in various consumer products such as carpet tile. NWSF’s expertise in derelict gear removal will also provide a training opportunity to one or two Canadian divers to learn about ghost gear retrieval work.

Finally, in addition to being a clean-up venture, the aim of this project is also ‘close the loop’, whereby the net will enter SHA’s recycling program and thus provides a great example of a cross-regional, collaborative effort.