Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Local Food Production: Aquaculture in the Salish Sea

Description

There is strong interest to develop native species for aquaculture in the Salish Sea to assist in diversifying the seafood production industry, to help alleviate production declines in other cultured species associated with an ongoing and reduced seed supply and to refocus efforts to the use of non-native species, a concern increasingly voiced today. Among the organisms poised for culture today are seaweeds (bull and sugar kelp), native bivalves (rock scallops), sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Significant progress has been made in developing culture techniques for rock scallops and seaweeds. Two case studies in aquaculture development will be discussed within the context of developing increased food security, diversity within the seafood industry operating in the Salish Sea while maintaining a sustainable approach to local seafood production.

The purple hinge rock scallop (Crassadoma gigantea) is a large scallop native to the North American west coast from Alaska to Baja, Mexico. A large adductor muscle, rapid growth, wide natural distribution and culinary appeal make it an excellent candidate for aquaculture with several efforts underway to better integrate the culture of this species with ongoing hatchery production. Similarly, efforts to establish seaweed culture in the Salish Sea are ongoing with the goal to potentially utilize seaweeds for habitat, a means to mitigate carbonate chemistry in sensitive water bodies and to provide food for emerging markets for sea vegetables. Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) and bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) are two species under active consideration for culture today.

Significant hurdles to the development of open water aquaculture for these and other native marine resources due mainly to permitting and public acceptance of activities associated with aquaculture. Public acceptance of sustainable aquaculture practices is particularly important to address as a food security issue as interest to establish systems for local food production increases.

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Emerging Species and Maintenance of Sustainable Approaches to Aquaculture of Seaweeds, Rock Scallops and Other Native Species in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

There is strong interest to develop native species for aquaculture in the Salish Sea to assist in diversifying the seafood production industry, to help alleviate production declines in other cultured species associated with an ongoing and reduced seed supply and to refocus efforts to the use of non-native species, a concern increasingly voiced today. Among the organisms poised for culture today are seaweeds (bull and sugar kelp), native bivalves (rock scallops), sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Significant progress has been made in developing culture techniques for rock scallops and seaweeds. Two case studies in aquaculture development will be discussed within the context of developing increased food security, diversity within the seafood industry operating in the Salish Sea while maintaining a sustainable approach to local seafood production.

The purple hinge rock scallop (Crassadoma gigantea) is a large scallop native to the North American west coast from Alaska to Baja, Mexico. A large adductor muscle, rapid growth, wide natural distribution and culinary appeal make it an excellent candidate for aquaculture with several efforts underway to better integrate the culture of this species with ongoing hatchery production. Similarly, efforts to establish seaweed culture in the Salish Sea are ongoing with the goal to potentially utilize seaweeds for habitat, a means to mitigate carbonate chemistry in sensitive water bodies and to provide food for emerging markets for sea vegetables. Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) and bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) are two species under active consideration for culture today.

Significant hurdles to the development of open water aquaculture for these and other native marine resources due mainly to permitting and public acceptance of activities associated with aquaculture. Public acceptance of sustainable aquaculture practices is particularly important to address as a food security issue as interest to establish systems for local food production increases.