Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Challenges and opportunities related to habitat enhancement, restoration, and ecosystem productivity in the Salish Sea

Description

Over the last 30 years, three non-native Spartina species have invaded southwestern British Columbia. One of the species in particular, Spartina anglica in the Vancouver Lower Mainland converts mudflats to monotypic stands of Spartina which in other areas such as Willipa Bay (Washington State) resulted in significant reductions in use by migratory bird populations.

Many challenges existed initially, and some continue to limit a comprehensive response to control and eradicate infestations. Some of the challenges included the lack of a single agency mandated to respond to Spartina infestations, lack of funding and capacity, regulatory restrictions for the use of herbicide, and community support for control options.

To address these challenges, the BC Spartina Working Group (BCSWG) – a partnership of government and non-government organizations was formed in 2004. This partnership expanded over time and coordinates monitoring and control activities, contributes funding (in-kind and cash), develops solutions to overcome some of the regulatory barriers and raises community awareness. However, the partnership still struggles to raise the necessary funding to confidently implement a complete eradication program and while overcoming the initial challenges, the partnership approach does create other challenges such as retaining staff that are hired seasonally and incurs more coordination resources. In spite of the challenges, progress continues to be made to curb the expansion of Spartina infestations in tidal wetlands and meet the next steps of containment and subsequent reduction.

While the Spartina control program is only one project within the landscape, this project would benefit if solutions can be found to overcome other broader challenges such as a) the need for a better framework (or partnership) that can set landscape restoration goals, b) increase capacity of restoration expertise across agencies/organizations that is often isolated within different agencies/organizations and therefore not available to all partners.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Restoring habitat in the Vancouver Lower Mainland and Lessons Learned from the Spartina control program in BC

2016SSEC

Over the last 30 years, three non-native Spartina species have invaded southwestern British Columbia. One of the species in particular, Spartina anglica in the Vancouver Lower Mainland converts mudflats to monotypic stands of Spartina which in other areas such as Willipa Bay (Washington State) resulted in significant reductions in use by migratory bird populations.

Many challenges existed initially, and some continue to limit a comprehensive response to control and eradicate infestations. Some of the challenges included the lack of a single agency mandated to respond to Spartina infestations, lack of funding and capacity, regulatory restrictions for the use of herbicide, and community support for control options.

To address these challenges, the BC Spartina Working Group (BCSWG) – a partnership of government and non-government organizations was formed in 2004. This partnership expanded over time and coordinates monitoring and control activities, contributes funding (in-kind and cash), develops solutions to overcome some of the regulatory barriers and raises community awareness. However, the partnership still struggles to raise the necessary funding to confidently implement a complete eradication program and while overcoming the initial challenges, the partnership approach does create other challenges such as retaining staff that are hired seasonally and incurs more coordination resources. In spite of the challenges, progress continues to be made to curb the expansion of Spartina infestations in tidal wetlands and meet the next steps of containment and subsequent reduction.

While the Spartina control program is only one project within the landscape, this project would benefit if solutions can be found to overcome other broader challenges such as a) the need for a better framework (or partnership) that can set landscape restoration goals, b) increase capacity of restoration expertise across agencies/organizations that is often isolated within different agencies/organizations and therefore not available to all partners.