Proposed Abstract Title

Remote monitoring of physical and biological properties in the Salish Sea: VENUS sea-surface monitoring with high frequency radar and instrumented ferries

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Remote sensing technology to monitor the short and long term dynamic of the Salish Sea

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Remote monitoring of sea surface properties is a key objective of the VENUS coastal observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC; www.oceannetworks.ca). Our focus is on the physically and biologically dynamic southern central Strait of Georgia where the Fraser River discharges into the Salish Sea. Here we discuss our experiences with: 1) a high frequency radar installation (Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar, CODAR); and 2) three instrumented ferry routes (starting in 2012). The CODAR system was deployed with two antennae on either side of the mouth of the Fraser River in 2011. This particular arrangement provides for hourly measurements of both radial and total surface current velocities in the vicinity of and including the Fraser River plume. Similarly, each of the three instrumented BC-Ferries routes transit through the Fraser River plume several times per day en route between Vancouver Island and the mainland. Measurements of salinity, temperature, phytoplankton biomass, dissolved oxygen, and coloured dissolved organic matter are available every 10 seconds (in real-time on the internet) and enable high-resolution, spatio-temporal characterization of sea-surface properties. We will present an overview of these relatively new time-series in the context of data products available to stakeholders in the Salish Sea.

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Remote monitoring of physical and biological properties in the Salish Sea: VENUS sea-surface monitoring with high frequency radar and instrumented ferries

2016SSEC

Remote monitoring of sea surface properties is a key objective of the VENUS coastal observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC; www.oceannetworks.ca). Our focus is on the physically and biologically dynamic southern central Strait of Georgia where the Fraser River discharges into the Salish Sea. Here we discuss our experiences with: 1) a high frequency radar installation (Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar, CODAR); and 2) three instrumented ferry routes (starting in 2012). The CODAR system was deployed with two antennae on either side of the mouth of the Fraser River in 2011. This particular arrangement provides for hourly measurements of both radial and total surface current velocities in the vicinity of and including the Fraser River plume. Similarly, each of the three instrumented BC-Ferries routes transit through the Fraser River plume several times per day en route between Vancouver Island and the mainland. Measurements of salinity, temperature, phytoplankton biomass, dissolved oxygen, and coloured dissolved organic matter are available every 10 seconds (in real-time on the internet) and enable high-resolution, spatio-temporal characterization of sea-surface properties. We will present an overview of these relatively new time-series in the context of data products available to stakeholders in the Salish Sea.