Proposed Abstract Title

The Fishing History of the Lummi People

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

The Power of Place - Promoting Decolonizing Methodologies in Water Governance in the Salish Sea

Location

2016SSEC

Description

The Fishing History of the Lummi People

Lummi Nation is a community of fishing people who have lived off the bounty of the Salish Sea for centuries. At Lummi – like many Coast Salish tribes – Fishing is central to our She’langen (way of life). Salmon are as important to our culture as the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the plants we harvest. It is our obligation to our ancestors and our future generations to preserve the knowledge of our fishing history. It is important for future generations of the Lummi Nation to learn this history, including the struggles the ancestors endured to ensure that our inherent and treaty rights were protected. For this presentation, I discuss the process of documenting the oral histories of Lummi Fisherman as part of my capstone project at Northwest Indian College. My work is informed by interviews with Lummi elders, fishers and other members of the Lummi Tribe. The interviews were conducted and collected to create a documentary that tells the story of the fishing history of the Lummi people. Assistance from Lummi Natural Resource Department propelled this work, and research was enhanced by archival and ethnographic documentation from both Western Washington University and Lummi Archives, as well as by research papers, scientific journals, and literature reviews.

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The Fishing History of the Lummi People

2016SSEC

The Fishing History of the Lummi People

Lummi Nation is a community of fishing people who have lived off the bounty of the Salish Sea for centuries. At Lummi – like many Coast Salish tribes – Fishing is central to our She’langen (way of life). Salmon are as important to our culture as the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the plants we harvest. It is our obligation to our ancestors and our future generations to preserve the knowledge of our fishing history. It is important for future generations of the Lummi Nation to learn this history, including the struggles the ancestors endured to ensure that our inherent and treaty rights were protected. For this presentation, I discuss the process of documenting the oral histories of Lummi Fisherman as part of my capstone project at Northwest Indian College. My work is informed by interviews with Lummi elders, fishers and other members of the Lummi Tribe. The interviews were conducted and collected to create a documentary that tells the story of the fishing history of the Lummi people. Assistance from Lummi Natural Resource Department propelled this work, and research was enhanced by archival and ethnographic documentation from both Western Washington University and Lummi Archives, as well as by research papers, scientific journals, and literature reviews.